2016年6月2日 星期四

liquidate, tread, stomp, stomping, stamping, stamp out, resubmit

BHS to be wound down as rescue attempt fails
BBC News - 41 mins ago
Department store BHS will go into liquidation with the loss of up to 11,000 jobs after efforts to ...

Leonard Bernstein
Describe Mahler's First Symphony in three words!
To help you brainstorm, peruse this score from the New York Philharmonic Digital Archives, marked by Bruno Walter, Leonard Bernstein, and Mahler himself.
"Mahler last conducted his own First Symphony on December 16 and 17, 1909, when he led the New York Philharmonic in the work's United States premiere. After his death in 1911, the score that he used in those performances remained in the Philharmonic Orchestra's Library and was stamped accordingly. It was used in later Philharmonic performances, and bears markings by Bruno Walter in 1933 (see note on top of the title page: "49 minutes B.W.") and Leonard Bernstein in 1959 or 1962."

ARCHIVES.NYPHIL.ORG

Baltimore Mayor Treads Fine Line in Divided City

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake must try to unite two Baltimores, neither of which she is entirely a part: the gentrified city and the frustrated, low-income city.


Vibrant, Timid Berlin

Since the glory of reunification, the city has been treading water.

"There was an overwhelming consensus that young Taiwanese are taking the initiative to promote Taiwan-related causes internationally, and that Cafe Philo is stepping up as a platform for overseas Taiwanese to make their voices heard and to instigate social change."
St. Marks Place in lower Manhattan is infamous for being the stomping grounds of hardcore hipster bar-hoppers and shisha smokers. But a different kind of concoction was brewing...
WWW.TAIPEITIMES.COM



He was mentioned in the 1972 song "Celluloid Heroes" by The Kinks: "If you stomped on Mickey Rooney/ He'd still turn 'round and smile..."
From the archive: Voting with their stamping feet Growing protests in Iran in the run-up to the revolution of 1979

Even though early Europeans knew about soap, many launderers preferred to use urine for its ammonia to get tough stains out of cloth. In fact, in ancient Rome, vessels for collecting urine were commonplace on streets–passers-by would relieve themselves into them and when the vats were full their contents were taken to a fullonica (a laundry), diluted with water and poured over dirty clothes. A worker would stand in the tub of urine and stomp on the clothes, similar to modern washing machine’s agitator.




Quote:


"You can't create a monster, then whine when it stomps on a few buildings." — Lisa Simpson



Luxury Stores Trim Inventory and Discounts
By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
High-end stores are trying to stamp out discount fever by stocking fewer items and selling them at full price.



Citing the handout, one prominent LDP member, Yoshimi Watanabe, a former financial-services minister who has long been unhappy about the lack of administrative and supply-side reforms, stomped out of the party on January 13th.



The Voodoo Behind The Voice
The VoiceLive Play is like a guitar stomp box, but for singers. It even supplies backup vocalists.


按下看大圖
漫畫來源: Ted Goff




resubmit

pronunciation

IN BRIEF: v. - Provide (information) again to a program or automatic system.

stomp (stŏmp, stômp) pronunciation
v., stomped, stomp·ing, stomps. v.tr.
To tread or trample heavily or violently on.

v.intr.
To tread or trample heavily or violently.

n.
  1. A dance involving a rhythmical, heavy step.
  2. The jazz music for this dance.
[Variant of STAMP.]
stomper stomp'er n.
stompingly stomp'ing·ly adv.
USAGE NOTE Stomp and stamp are interchangeable in the sense "to trample" or "to tread on violently": stomped (or stamped) to death; stomping (or stamping) horses. Only stamp is used with out to mean "to eliminate": stamp out a fire; stamp out poverty. Stamp is also standard in the sense "to strike the ground with the foot, as in anger or frustration," [to bring the foot down quickly] as in He stamped his foot and began to cry. In an earlier survey the use of stomp in this example was rejected by a large majority of the Usage Panel.


1 ((略式))=stamp.
2 [U]ストンプ(を踊る):速くて強いリズムの曲[踊り].

stomp 
verb
1 [I usually + adverb or preposition] to walk with intentionally heavy steps, especially as a way of showing that you are annoyed:
She stomped up the stairs and slammed her bedroom door.
He woke up in a bad mood and stomped off to the bathroom.

2 [I or T] US FOR stamp (FOOT).v., stomped, stomp·ing, stomps. v.tr.
To tread or trample heavily or violently on.

v.intr.
To tread or trample heavily or violently.

n.
  1. A dance involving a rhythmical, heavy step.
  2. The jazz music for this dance.
[Variant of STAMP.]
stomper stomp'er n.
stompingly stomp'ing·ly adv.
USAGE NOTE Stomp and stamp are interchangeable in the sense "to trample" or "to tread on violently": stomped (or stamped) to death; stomping (or stamping) horses. Only stamp is used with out to mean "to eliminate": stamp out a fire; stamp out poverty. Stamp is also standard in the sense "to strike the ground with the foot, as in anger or frustration," [to bring the foot down quickly] as in He stamped his foot and began to cry. In an earlier survey the use of stomp in this example was rejected by a large majority of the Usage Panel.






stomping Line breaks: stomp|ing
Pronunciation: /stɒmpɪŋ/

ADJECTIVE


(Of popular music) having a fast tempo and a heavy beat:I needed a really stomping guitar line
stamp also stamp out
verb
  1. To step on heavily and repeatedly so as to crush, injure, or destroy: stomp, tramp, trample, tread, tromp. See help/harm/harmless.
  2. To walk with loud, heavy steps: stomp, tramp, trample. Informal tromp. See move/halt, sounds/pleasant sounds/unpleasant sounds/neutral sounds or silence.
  3. To produce a deep impression of: engrave, etch, fix, grave3, impress, imprint, inscribe. See marks.
phrasal verb - stamp out
    To destroy all traces of: abolish, annihilate, blot out, clear, eradicate, erase, exterminate, extinguish, extirpate, kill1, liquidate, obliterate, remove, root1 (out or up), rub out, snuff out, uproot, wipe out. Idioms: do away with, make an end of, put an end to,, help/harm/harmless, make/unmake.
noun
  1. The visible effect made on a surface by pressure: impress, impression, imprint, indent, indentation, mark, print. See marks.
  2. Something visible or evident that gives grounds for believing in the existence or presence of something else: badge, evidence, index, indication, indicator, manifestation, mark, note, sign, signification, symptom, token, witness. See show/hide.
  3. A class that is defined by the common attribute or attributes possessed by all its members: breed, cast, description, feather, ilk, kind2, lot, manner, mold, nature, order, sort, species, stripe, type, variety. Informal persuasion. See group.



Definition of tread in English:

verb (past trod /trɒd/; past participle trodden /ˈtrɒd(ə)n/ or trod)

[NO OBJECT, WITH ADVERBIAL]
1Walk in a specified way:Rosa trod as lightly as she couldfigurative the government had to tread carefully so as not to offend the judiciary
(tread on) chiefly British Set one’s foot down on top of:the youth stumbled and trod on Harry’s shoe
1.2[WITH OBJECT] Walk on or along:shoppers will soon be treading the floors of the new shopping mall
1.3[WITH OBJECT AND ADVERBIAL] Press down or crush with the feet:food had been trodden into the carpet

noun

Back to top  
1[IN SINGULAR] A person’s manner of walking or the sound made as they walk:heard the heavy tread of Dad’s boots
2(also tread board)The top surface of a step or stair.
3The thick moulded part of a vehicle tyre that grips theroad.
3.1The part of a wheel that touches the ground or arail.
3.2The upper surface of a railway track, in contact with the wheels.
4The part of the sole of a shoe that rests on the ground.






tread (or chiefly North American step) on someone's toes

3
Offend someone by encroaching on their area ofresponsibility:I have no wish to tread on the toes of colleagues with local interests



tread water

4
Maintain an upright position in deep water by moving the feet with a walking movement and the hands with a downward circular motion:they were at the deep end of the pool and trod water to keep afloat
 to keep afloat





Line breaks: stamp



Definition of stamp in English:

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
1Bring down (one’s foot) heavily on the ground or on something on the ground:he stamped his foot in frustration[NO OBJECT]: he threw his cigarette down and stamped on itfigurative Robertson stamped on all these suggestions
1.1[WITH OBJECT AND ADVERBIAL] Crushflatten, or remove with a heavy blow from one’s foot:she stamped the snow from her boots
1.2[NO OBJECT, WITH ADVERBIAL OF DIRECTION] Walk with heavy, forceful steps:John stamped off, muttering
2Impress a pattern or mark on (a surface, object, or document) using an engraved or inked block or die:the woman stamped my passport
2.1Impress (a pattern or mark) with an engraved orinked block or die:a key with a number stamped on the shaftfigurative it’s one of those records that has ‘classic’ stamped all over it
2.2Make (something) by cutting it out with a die or mould:the knives are stamped out from a flat strip of steel
2.3Reveal or mark out as having a particular quality or ability:his style stamps him as a player to watch
3Fix a postage stamp or stamps on to (a letter):Annie stamped the envelope for her
4Crush or pulverize (ore).



liquidate

ˈlɪkwɪdeɪt/
verb
  1. 1.
    wind up the affairs of (a business) by ascertaining liabilities and apportioning assets.
    "if the company was liquidated, there would be enough funds released to honour the debts"
    synonyms:close down, wind up, put into liquidation, dissolve, break up, disband,terminate
    "if the company was liquidated, there would be enough funds released to honour the debts"
  2. 2.
    informal
    kill (someone), typically by violent means.
    "nationalist rivals and critics were liquidated in bloody purges"

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