2016年4月30日 星期六

garish, monetize, among, between, tart, freebie, among others, garish


In building garish monuments that the establishment finds vulgar, Donald Trump found his public, and paved the way for himself as a brand
What is it about Trump style that appeals and repulses?
ECON.ST




High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/cc8e8cb6-3ca8-11e4-9733-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz3DZfKjKhmThe light-hearted tone of the messages concealed a serious headache for Apple’s Asian competitors. While they have often moved into new product areas such as large-screen phones, smartwatches and payment technology before the US tech group, they have consistently been unable to match the excitement generated by Apple product launches – or its success in monetising and globalising their usage.



 Dr. Deming 除贊美之外,用by the way 方式指出該論文有一處英文錯用;

 ...encourage competition among divisions and departments.

Dr. Deming 將among 畫掉,改成 between .



*http://maaw.info/ArticleSummaries/ArtSumYoshida89.htm





Interactive: Jacqueline Kennedy Speaks
In newly released tapes, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy delivers tart commentary on former presidents, heads of state and her husband's aides, among others.


 Such an inflexible apportionment of jobs, rather like an old-fashioned assembly line, flouts modern management techniques where team members typically float between roles. It is viable during the Olympics because so many workers are volunteers, rewarded only with a garish purple-and-red uniform and, hopefully, a fun time. As Mr Deighton acknowledges, “If you were paying these people you’d obviously reach the conclusion that you could save costs by having fewer of them.”




garish[gar・ish]

  • レベル:社会人必須
  • 発音記号[géəriʃ]

[形]
1 〈服装・装飾などが〉(不快なほどに)けばけばしい, はですぎる;〈人が〉明るい色の服を着た, あざやかに飾った.
2 〈建物・文章などが〉凝りすぎた.
3 〈光線などが〉まばゆい, ぎらぎらする.
gar・ish・ly
[副]
gar・ish・ness

(gâr'ĭsh, găr'-) pronunciation
adj.
    1. Marked by strident color or excessive ornamentation; gaudy.
    2. Loud and flashy: garish makeup. See synonyms at gaudy1.
  1. Glaring; dazzling: "Hide me from Day's garish eye" (John Milton).
[Origin unknown.]
garishly gar'ish·ly adv.
garishness gar'ish·ness n.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/garish#ixzz2D0kw29k2
garish

(gâr'ĭsh, găr'-) pronunciation
adj.
  1.  
    1. Marked by strident color or excessive ornamentation; gaudy.
    2. Loud and flashy: garish makeup. See synonyms at gaudy1.
  2. Glaring; dazzling: "Hide me from Day's garish eye" (John Milton).
[Origin unknown.]
garishly gar'ish·ly adv.
garishness gar
'ish·ness n.

(gâr'ĭsh, găr'-) pronunciation
adj.
    1. Marked by strident color or excessive ornamentation; gaudy.
    2. Loud and flashy: garish makeup. See synonyms at gaudy1.
  1. Glaring; dazzling: "Hide me from Day's garish eye" (John Milton).
[Origin unknown.]
garishly gar'ish·ly adv.
garishness gar'ish·ness n.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/garish#ixzz2D0kw29k2
tart
(tärt) pronunciation
adj., tart·er, tart·est.
  1. Having a sharp pungent taste; sour. See synonyms at sour.
  2. Sharp or bitter in tone or meaning; cutting.
[Middle English, from Old English teart, severe.]
tartly tart'ly adv.
tartness tart'ness n.

tart2 (tärt) pronunciation
n.
    1. A pastry shell with shallow sides, no top crust, and any of various fillings.
    2. Chiefly British. A pie.
    1. A prostitute.
    2. A woman considered to be sexually promiscuous.
tr.v. Chiefly British, tart·ed, tart·ing, tarts.
To dress up or make fancy in a tawdry, garish way. Often used with up.


[Middle English tarte, from Old French, perhaps alteration of tartane, from Late Latin torta, a kind of bread.]



Bloggers Must Disclose Product Ties
Bloggers, Tweeters and online marketers will have to tell consumers when they are paid or given freebies to write positive reviews or postings, the FTC said.


Software Companies Resort to Freebies
Some technology companies are taking an unorthodox approach to selling software in the recession: giving it away.




The holidays are almost here, and Google's got some freebies for you -- if you sign up soon.



IBM Takes New Anti-Office Tack
SYS-CON Media - Montvale,NJ,USA
IBM is starting to monetize Lotus Symphony, its freebie collection of Office-displacing ODF-based software for creating and sharing documents, ...

freebie
noun [C] INFORMAL
something which is given to you without you having to pay for it, especially as a way of attracting your support for or interest in something:
The company's marketing rep was giving out pens and mugs - the usual freebies.
The journalists were all given a freebie lunch.



among

Line breaks: among
Pronunciation: /əˈmʌŋ
 
/
(chiefly British also amongst /əˈmʌŋst/)


preposition

  • 1Situated more or less centrally in relation to (several other things): flowers hidden among the roots of the trees you’re among friends
  • 2Being a member or members of (a larger set): a British woman was among the 54 victims of the disaster snakes are among the animals most feared by man

  • 3Occurring in or shared by (some members of a group or community): a drop in tooth decay among children members of the government bickered among themselves
  • 4Indicating a division, choice, or differentiation involving three or more participants: the old king called the three princesses to divide his kingdom among them the State Council would elect a temporary president from among its members


Origin

Old English ongemang (from on 'in' + gemang 'assemblage, mingling'). The -st of amongst represents -s (adverbial genitive) + -t probably by association with superlatives (as in against).


monetize

Line breaks: mon¦et|ize
Pronunciation: /ˈmʌnɪtʌɪz
  
/

(also monetise)

VERB

[WITH OBJECT]
1Convert into or express in the form of currency:Hamilton had monetized the entire federal and state war debts
1.1(usually as adjective monetized) Convert or adapt (a society, economy, etc.) to trade based on the exchange of money:a fully monetized society

Origin

late 19th century: from French monétiser, from Latinmoneta 'money'.

Derivatives


monetization


Pronunciation: /-ˈzeɪʃ(ə)n/
NOUN

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