2013年7月10日 星期三

tic, muscular, sinew, enervated /debilitated wonk, Muscular Christianity , militarily, Lyme

When Lyme Disease Lasts and Lasts

By JANE E. BRODY
Often misdiagnosed and mistreated, chronic Lyme disease leaves thousands of people physically and mentally debilitated and without a medically established recourse.


Iran and Hezbollah Support for Syria Complicates Peace-Talk Strategy
By MICHAEL R. GORDON and STEVEN LEE MYERS
The stepped-up support President Bashar al-Assad of Syria has received from Iran and Hezbollah appears to have fortified his belief that he can hang on to power and prevail militarily.


Obama's Turn in Bush's Bind
By PETER BAKER
A onetime critic of his predecessor, President Obama finds himself justifying muscular defense policies while detractors complain that he has sacrificed core values.


Can DPJ rebuild a debilitated nation under new leadership?
After constant movements and maneuverings in the Democratic Party of Japan's presidential election, Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda, the first candidate to indicate his intention to run, emerged victorious. (August 31) [more]
SMELLS LIKE SCHOOL SPIRIT
David Brooks writes in The New York Times: Diane Ravitch’s narrative is that America has humane local schools that are being threatened by testing wonks. The fact is that many schools have become spiritually enervated and even great teachers struggle in an inert culture. It’s the reformers who often bring the passion, using tests as a lever. If your school teaches to the test, it’s not the test’s fault. It’s the leaders of your school.


wonk
(wŏngk) pronunciation
n. Slang
  1. A student who studies excessively; a grind.
  2. One who studies an issue or a topic thoroughly or excessively: "leading a talkathon of policy wonks in a methodical effort to build consensus for his programs" (Michael Kranish).
[Origin unknown.]


enervate
(ĕn'ər-vāt') pronunciation
tr.v., -vat·ed, -vat·ing, -vates.
  1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: "the luxury which enervates and destroys nations" (Henry David Thoreau). See synonyms at deplete.
  2. Medicine. To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr'vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

[Latin ēnervāre, ēnervāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + nervus, sinew.]
enervation en'er·va'tion n.
enervative en'er·va'tive adj.
enervator en'er·va'tor n.
USAGE NOTE Sometimes people mistakenly use enervate to mean "to invigorate" or "to excite" by assuming that this word is a close cousin of the verb energize. In fact enervate does not come from the same source as energize (Greek energos, "active"). It comes from Latin nervus, "sinew." Thus enervate means "to cause to become 'out of muscle'," that is, "to weaken or deplete of strength."

debilitate
(dĭ-bĭl'ĭ-tāt') pronunciation
tr.v., -tat·ed, -tat·ing, -tates.
To sap the strength or energy of; enervate.

[Latin dēbilitāre, dēbilitāt-, from dēbilis, weak.]


  • [dibílətèit]
[動](他)〈人を〉弱らせる, 衰弱させる;〈組織・政府などを〉弱体化させる.
In the view of both political analysts and technology experts here and in the United States, China’s attempts to tighten its grip on Internet use are driven in part by the conviction that the West — and particularly the United States — is wielding communications innovations from malware to Twitter to weaken it militarily and to stir dissent internally.
“The United States has already done it, many times,” said Song Xiaojun, one of the authors of “Unhappy China,” a 2009 book advocating a muscular Chinese foreign policy, which the government’s propaganda department is said to promote. He cited the so-called color revolutions in Ukraine and Georgia as examples. “It is not really regime change, directly,” he said. “It is more like they use the Internet to sow chaos.”
Return to book
1. on Page 85:
"... parentheses from their rightful places. Use it effectively, and affectionately, but don't let it take over and become a stylistic tic. ..."



He also had a number of tics and other involuntary movements;

tic

(tĭk) pronunciation
A habitual spasmodic muscular movement or contraction, usually of the face or extremities.
intr.v., ticced, tic·cing, tics.
To have a tic; produce tics.

【醫】(面部習慣性的)抽筋;痙攣

梁永安提供

妥瑞症( Tourette syndrome )是一種兒童腦部基底核(basal ganglia)的慢性疾病,此症候群會反反覆覆、好好壞壞地出現半不自主性的動作及聲語上的tic。tic最常出現的有眨眼睛、噘嘴、裝鬼臉、聳肩膀、搖頭晃腦等快速而短促的動作,另有清喉嚨、擤鼻子、發出類似罵人的"幹"音、或一長串詛咒的聲音等。

[F.] n. 【医】(顔面の)けいれん, チック; くせ, 特徴.


音節
múscular Christiánity
[U]筋肉的キリスト教:強健な肉体と快活さを尊ぶ.
Muscular Christianity is a term for a movement during the Victorian era which stressed the need for energetic Christian activism in combination with an ideal of vigorous masculinity. It was most associated with the English writers Charles Kingsley and Thomas Hughes, though the name was bestowed by others.
Kingsley and Hughes promoted physical strength and health (at least for men) as well as an active pursuit of Christian ideals in personal life and politics.
The term has also been applied to later movements that combine physical and Christian spiritual development.

Contents

[hide]


mus·cu·lar (mŭs'kyə-lər) pronunciationadj.
  1. Of, relating to, or consisting of muscle: muscular contraction.
  2. Having well-developed muscles: a muscular build.
  3. Having or suggesting great forcefulness, especially at the expense of subtlety: muscular reasoning that does not bother with the finer points; muscular advocacy groups.
[From Latin mūsculus, muscle. See muscle.]
muscularity mus'cu·lar'i·ty (-lăr'ĭ-tē) n.
muscularly mus'cu·lar·ly adv.
SYNONYMS muscular, athletic, brawny, burly, sinewy. These adjectives mean strong and powerfully built: a muscular build; an athletic swimmer; brawny arms; a burly stevedore; a lean and sinewy frame.


muscular


 
音節
mus • cu • lar
発音
mʌ'skjulər
レベル
大学入試程度
[形]
1 筋肉の発達した, (筋骨)たくましい.
2 筋肉の;筋肉(の影響)による
muscular movement
筋肉運動.
3 〈表現・行為などが〉力強い. ▼繊細さに欠けるの意を含む
muscular prose
力強い散文.
4 肉体活動を通した.
[△MUSCLE
mùs・cu・lár・i・ty
[名]
mus・cu・lar・ly
[副]



Definition of military

adjective

  • relating to or characteristic of soldiers or armed forces:the build-up of military activity

noun

(the military)
  • the armed forces of a country: the military took power last September to crush a national uprising

Derivatives


militarily

adverb

militariness

noun

Origin:

late Middle English: from French militaire or Latin militaris, from miles, milit- 'soldier'




 Lyme
萊姆病萊姆疏螺旋體病是一種傳染性蜱媒病,由伯氏疏螺旋體 (一種革蘭氏陰性菌微生物),導致的疾病。
因為這種病被公認是在1975年10月,在康乃狄克州老萊姆鎮,萊姆鎮東哈丹姆附近地區首次發現而得名。這種病是由於被感染的叮咬而傳染的。1982年美國國家衛生總局威利·伯格多費(Willy Burgdorfer)和同事從丹敏硬蜱(Ixodes dammini)分離到萊姆病病原體。
萊姆病是一種地區性、全身性、慢性為症性蜱媒螺旋體病。早期以皮膚慢性遊走性紅斑為特點,以後出現神經、心臟或關節病變,通常在夏季和早秋發病,可發生於任何年齡,男性略多於女性。

沒有留言: