2017年4月25日 星期二

flourish, brandish, wave, fanfare, Eros, Anteros, prosper

Allen & Co. Flourishes as a Tech Deal Maker

Diamond Jubilee: Final flourish for Queen's celebrations


 The awesome Fanfare For the Common Man by Aaron Copland.

This fanfare was written on request from Eugene Goossens, conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, in response to the US entry into the Second World War.
During the First World War, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra had asked British composers for a fanfare to begin each orchestral concert. It had been so successful that he thought to repeat the procedure in World War II with American composers.
Goossens suggested titles like Fanfare for Soldiers, but Copland gave it the much better title Fanfare for the Common Man.
The piece was premiered 12 March 1943 at income tax time, as a homage to the common man.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NjssV8UuVA


Israel's Flourishing Russian Culture
Israeli Russians have retained a sense of their culture, language and identity — remaining slightly apart.



Obama Signs Health Care Overhaul Bill, With a Flourish
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG and ROBERT PEAR
The most sweeping social legislation enacted in decades became law after a festive, at times raucous, signing ceremony in the White House on Tuesday.



Yahoo Inc. has decided to discontinue its Livestand digital news reading application for mobile devices, which had been unveiled in November to much fanfare after suffering delays.
  Google looks to take on Apple iPad
CNNMoney.com
By David Goldman, staff writerFebruary 4, 2010: 2:32 PM ET NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- As the fanfare over Apple's new iPad reaches a fever pitch, Google is ...


Modern Flourishes as Obamas Host State Dinner
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
At their first state dinner, President Obama and his wife, Michelle, made sure to infuse the glittering gala with distinctive touches.








Anteros by Alfred Gilbert, 1885; from the Shaftesbury Memorial in Piccadilly Circus.
In Greek mythology, Anteros (Greek: Ἀντέρως, Antérōs) was the god of requited love, literally "love returned" or "counter-love" and also the punisher of those who scorn love and the advances of others, or the avenger of unrequited love.
Anteros was the son of Ares and Aphrodite in Greek mythology, given to his brother Eros, who was lonely, as a playmate, the rationale being that love must be answered if it is to prosper. Alternatively, he was said to have arisen from the mutual love between Poseidon and Nerites.[1] Physically, he is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and plumed butterfly wings. He has been described also as armed with either a golden club or arrows of lead.
Anteros, with Eros, was one of a host of winged love gods called Erotes, the ever-youthful winged gods of love, usually depicted as winged boys in the company of Aphrodite or her attendant goddesses.
An altar to this god was put up by the metics in Athens in commemoration of the spurned love of the metic Timagoras who was rejected by the Athenian Meles[disambiguation needed ]. Upon hearing Timagoras' declaration of love for him, the young man mockingly ordered him to throw himself down from the top of a tall rock. Seeing Timagoras dead, Meles repented and threw himself down from the same rock.[2]
Describing the nature of the emotion, Plato asserts that it is the result of the great love for another person. The lover, inspired by beauty, is filled with divine love and "filling the soul of the loved one with love in return." As a result, the loved one falls in love with the lover, though the love is only spoken of as friendship. They experience pain when the two are apart, and relief when they are together, the mirror image of the lover's feelings, is anteros, or "counter-love."[3]
Anteros is the subject of the Shaftesbury Memorial in Piccadilly Circus, London, where he symbolises the selfless philanthropic love of the Earl of Shaftesbury for the poor. The memorial is sometimes given the name The Angel of Christian Charity and is popularly mistaken for Eros.[4]


brandished the two-finger V sign, flourish














Nixon frequently brandished the two-finger V sign (alternately viewed as the "Victory sign" or "peace sign") using both hands, an act that became one of his best-known trademarks.[249]


2011
Modern Flourishes as Obamas Host State Dinner 
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
At their first state dinner, President Obama and his wife, Michelle, made sure to infuse the glittering gala with distinctive touches.




brandish
ˈbrandɪʃ/
verb
  1. wave or flourish (something, especially a weapon) as a threat or in anger or excitement.

    "a man leaped out brandishing a knife"

brandish
[動](他)
1 〈剣などを〉(威嚇するように)振り回す;〈やりを〉しごく.
2 …をこれ見よがしに見せる[示す].
━━[名](剣などを)振り回すこと, 一振り.
bran・dish・er
[名]




flour·ish (flûr'ĭsh, flŭr'-pronunciation
v.-ished-ish·ing-ish·esv.intr.
  1. To grow well or luxuriantly; thrive: The crops flourished in the rich soil.
  2. To do or fare well; prosper: "No village on the railroad failed to flourish" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
  3. To be in a period of highest productivity, excellence, or influence: a poet who flourished in the tenth century.
  4. To make bold, sweeping movements: The banner flourished in the wind.
v.tr.
To wield, wave, or exhibit dramatically.

n.
  1. A dramatic or stylish movement, as of waving or brandishing: "A few ... musicians embellish their performance with a flourish of the fingers" (Frederick D. Bennett).
  2. An embellishment or ornamentation: a signature with a distinctive flourish.
  3. An ostentatious act or gesture: a flourish of generosity.
  4. Music. A showy or ceremonious passage, such as a fanfare.
[Middle English florishen, from Old French florir, floriss-, from Vulgar Latin *flōrīre, from Latin flōrēre, to bloom, from flōs, flōr-, flower.]
flourisher flour'ish·er n.
SYNONYMS flourish, brandish, wave. These verbs mean to swing back and forth boldly and dramatically: flourished her newly signed contract; brandish a sword; waving a baton.





flour·ish (flûr'ĭsh, flŭr'-) pronunciation
v., -ished, -ish·ing, -ish·es. v.intr.
  1. To grow well or luxuriantly; thrive: The crops flourished in the rich soil.
  2. To do or fare well; prosper: "No village on the railroad failed to flourish" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
  3. To be in a period of highest productivity, excellence, or influence: a poet who flourished in the tenth century.
  4. To make bold, sweeping movements: The banner flourished in the wind.
v.tr.
To wield, wave, or exhibit dramatically.

n.
  1. A dramatic or stylish movement, as of waving or brandishing: "A few ... musicians embellish their performance with a flourish of the fingers" (Frederick D. Bennett).
  2. An embellishment or ornamentation: a signature with a distinctive flourish.
  3. An ostentatious act or gesture: a flourish of generosity.
  4. Music. A showy or ceremonious passage, such as a fanfare.
bold or extravagant gesture or action, made especially to attract attention:with a flourish, she ushered them inside

[Middle English florishen, from Old French florir, floriss-, from Vulgar Latin *flōrīre, from Latin flōrēre, to bloom, from flōs, flōr-, flower.]
flourisher flour'ish·er n.
SYNONYMS flourish, brandish, wave. These verbs mean to swing back and forth boldly and dramatically: flourished her newly signed contract; brandish a sword; waving a baton.


━━ v. 繁茂する; 繁盛する, 栄える; 活躍する; 〔戯言〕 元気でいる; (剣・腕などを)振回す; 見せびらかす; 飾り書きに書く; はなやかに書く[話す,奏する].
━━ n. 振回し; (署名などの)飾り書き; 見せびらかし; はなやかな表現; 【楽】装飾楽句; ファンファーレ.
with a flourish 飾り立てて; 大げさな身振りで.
flour・ish・ing・ly ━━ ad. 繁盛して; 盛大に; 元気で.

Definition of flourish

verb


  • 1 [no object] (of a living organism) grow or develop in a healthy or vigorous way, especially as the result of a particularly congenial environment:wild plants flourish on the banks of the lake
  • develop rapidly and successfully:the organization has continued to flourish
  • [with adverbial] be working or at the height of one’s career during a specified period:the caricaturist and wit who flourished in the early years of this century
  • 2 [with object] wave (something) about to attract attention:‘Happy New Year!’ he yelled, flourishing a bottle of whisky

noun

  • 1a bold or extravagant gesture or action, made especially to attract attention:with a flourish, she ushered them inside
  • an elaborate rhetorical or literary expression.
  • an ornamental flowing curve in handwriting or scrollwork:letters with an emphatic flourish beneath them
  • 2 an impressive and successful act or period:United produced a late second-half flourish
  • 3 Music a fanfare played by brass instruments: a flourish of trumpets
  • an ornate musical passage.
  • an extemporized addition played especially at the beginning or end of a composition.
Derivatives


flourisher
noun

Origin:

Middle English: from Old French floriss-, lengthened stem of florir, based on Latin florere, from flos, flor- 'a flower'. The noun senses 'ornamental curve' and 'florid expression' come from an obsolete sense of the verb, 'adorn' (originally with flowers)


fanfare[fan・fare]

  • レベル:社会人必須
  • 発音記号[fǽnfεər]
  • (făn'fâr') pronunciation
    n.
  • Music. A loud flourish of brass instruments, especially trumpets.《查拉圖斯特拉如是說》
    開頭的段落是信號曲(fanfare),用了天主教的管風琴聲響來撐起古波斯先知的進場
  • A spectacular public display.
[French, possibly of imitative origin.]

[名]
1 ファンファーレ.
2 大げさな見せびらかし, 誇示;((略式))宣伝, 広告.
[フランス語. 原義は「ほらふき」. アラビア語farfār(おしゃべりの)と関係]

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