2015年12月5日 星期六

bunt, punt, painted bunting, punting, punter, heckle, pivot on, hit and run





Punting on the Cam.
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When measurement tools are broken, investors who rely on indices are flying blind. With authorities trying to manipulate stocks up, they may be worth betting on anyway. But anyone gambling on China’s domestic shares should be clear: this is mostly a punt on how much the Chinese trust their leaders to control prices, not investment.

Learn a musical instrument, go to a strip club and heckle the punters, pretend you’re Katie Hopkins for a day and don’t roll your eyes at me the next time I say something’s “gone wrong” with the central heating... 'inspired' by reading about the list Claire Potter set her husband Jim Greenan to mark his 50th birthday, we asked one of our writers to do the same for his wife.


50 ways to annoy your partner (or the quick road to divorce)

Hearing of the woman who marked her husband’s birthday by giving him...
THEGUARDIAN.COM|由 STUART JEFFRIES 上傳


In Turmoil, News Corp. Pivots on BSkyB
News Corp. punted its proposed takeover of BSkyB to an independent antitrust regulator, slowing and possibly depoliticizing the approval process for a deal jeopardized by a scandal at the company's U.K. newspaper unit.



Dancing punts


QUOTATION OF THE DAY


"Bunt, hit and run - they don't do that anymore!"

MIKE SANDLOCK, 97, the oldest living Dodger, on the modern game.



punt




━━ n. (さおで操る)平底船. ...



  • 自動
  • 〈英〉賭ける
  • 自他動
  • 《アメフト》パントする
  • 他動
  • 〜をパント船で運ぶ
  • 《アメフト》パント◆ボールを地面に置かずにキックすること。
n.
An open flatbottom boat with squared ends, used in shallow waters and usually propelled by a long pole.

v.punt·edpunt·ingpuntsv.tr.
  1. To propel (a boat) with a pole.
  2. To carry in a punt.
v.intr.
To go in a punt.
[Probably Middle English *punt, from Old English punt, from Latin pontō, pontoon, flatbottom boat, from pōns, pont-, bridge.]
punter punt'er n.
punt2 (pŭntpronunciation Football.
n.
A kick in which the ball is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground.

v.punt·edpunt·ingpuntsv.tr.
To propel (a ball) by means of a punt.
v.intr.
  1. To execute a punt.
  2. Informal. To cease doing something; give up: Let's punt on this and try something else.
[Perhaps from dialectal punt, to strike, push, perhaps alteration of bunt.]
punter punt'er n.
punt3 (pŭntpronunciation
intr.v.punt·edpunt·ingpunts.
  1. Games. To lay a bet against the bank, as in roulette.
  2. Chiefly British Slang. To gamble.
[French ponter, from obsolete pont, past participle of pondre, to put (obsolete), to lay an egg, from Old French, to lay an egg, from Latin pōnere.]
punter punt'er n.
punt4 (pŭntpronunciation
n.
The indentation in the bottom of a champagne or wine bottle.
[Perhaps from punty, iron rod used in glass blowing, probably from French pontil, from pointe, point, from Old French. See point.]



heckle

Line breaks: heckle
Pronunciation: /ˈhɛk(ə)l Definition of heckle in English:



VERB

[WITH OBJECT]
1Interrupt (a public speaker) with derisive oraggressive comments or abuse:he was booed and heckled when he tried to addressthe demonstrators[NO OBJECT]: women round him started heckling


2Dress (flax or hemp) to split and straighten the fibresfor spinning:hemp was heckled and spun into rope yarn

NOUN


A heckling comment:
heckles of ‘Get stuffed!’

Origin

Middle English (in sense 2 of the verb): from heckle 'flax comb', a northern and eastern form of hackle. The sense 'interrupt (a public speaker) with aggressive comments' arose in the mid 17th century; for the development in sense, compare with tease.


bunt

(bŭnt) pronunciation

v., bunt·ed, bunt·ing, bunts.
v.tr.
  1. Baseball.
    1. To bat (a pitched ball) by tapping it lightly so that the ball rolls slowly in front of the infielders.
    2. To cause (a base runner) to advance or (a run) to score by bunting.
  2. To push or strike with or as if with the head; butt.
v.intr.
  1. Baseball. To bunt a pitched ball: The batter squared away to bunt.
  2. To butt.
n.
  1. Baseball.
    1. The act of bunting.
    2. A bunted ball.
  2. A butt with or as if with the head.
[Dialectal, to push, strike.]
bunter bunt'er n.


[動](他)(自)
1 《野球》(球を)バントする.
2 〈ヤギ・子牛が〉(…を)角で突く, 頭で押す.
━━[名]
1 《野球》バント
a bunt for a hit
セーフティーバント.
2 角の突き, 頭の押し.

Read more: http://goo.gl/ZCrdq


Discovery 分享了 1 條連結
8小時
A mature male painted bunting (Passerina ciris) has been spotted…
WWW.DISCOVERY.COM


punt
(pŭnt) pronunciation
n.
An open flatbottom boat with squared ends, used in shallow waters and usually propelled by a long pole.

v., punt·ed, punt·ing, punts. v.tr.
  1. To propel (a boat) with a pole.
  2. To carry in a punt.
v.intr.
To go in a punt.

[Probably Middle English *punt, from Old English punt, from Latin pontō, pontoon, flatbottom boat, from pōns, pont-, bridge.]
punter punt'er n.

punt2 (pŭnt) pronunciation Football.
n.
A kick in which the ball is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground.

v., punt·ed, punt·ing, punts. v.tr.
To propel (a ball) by means of a punt.

v.intr.
  1. To execute a punt.
  2. Informal. To cease doing something; give up: Let's punt on this and try something else.
[Perhaps from dialectal punt, to strike, push, perhaps alteration of bunt.]
punter punt'er n.

punt3 (pŭnt) pronunciation
intr.v., punt·ed, punt·ing, punts.
  1. Games. To lay a bet against the bank, as in roulette.
  2. Chiefly British Slang. To gamble.
[French ponter, from obsolete pont, past participle of pondre, to put (obsolete), to lay an egg, from Old French, to lay an egg, from Latin pōnere.]
punter punt'er n.

punt4 (pŭnt) pronunciation
n.
The indentation in the bottom of a champagne or wine bottle.

[Perhaps from punty, iron rod used in glass blowing, probably from French pontil, from pointe, point, from Old French. See point.]
  • [pʌ'nt]
[動](自)
1 ((英))(競馬などで)賭(か)ける.
2 《トランプ》親元と反対に賭ける.
━━[名]
1 ((英略式))賭け金.
2 《トランプ》親元と反対に賭ける人.
take a punt
((略式))一か八(ばち)かやってみる, 賭けてみる.
punt・er
[名]((英略式))賭けをする人;客;売春婦の客.




punter

Line breaks: punt¦er
Pronunciation: /ˈpʌntə /





Definition of punter in English:

NOUN

1informal , chiefly British A person who gambles, places a bet, or makes a risky investment.

1.1customer or client, especially a member of anaudience.

2American Football & Rugby player who punts.

3A person who propels or travels in a punt.


pivot
(pĭv'ət) pronunciation
n.
  1. A short rod or shaft on which a related part rotates or swings.
  2. A person or thing on which something depends or turns; the central or crucial factor.
  3. The act of turning on or as if on a pivot.
  4. Basketball.
    1. A position taken by an offensive player usually facing away from the basket near the foul line to relay passes, attempt a shot, or set screens.
    2. The stationary foot around which the ball handler is allowed to pivot without dribbling.

v., -ot·ed, -ot·ing, -ots. v.tr.
  1. To mount on, attach by, or provide with a pivot or pivots.
  2. To cause to rotate, revolve, or turn.
v.intr.
To turn on or as if on a pivot: "The plot . . . lacks direction, pivoting on Hamlet's incertitude" (G. Wilson Knight).

[French, from Old French.]
pivotable piv'ot·a·ble adj.


  • [pívət]
[名]
1 《機械》ピボット, 旋回心軸
a pivot bridge
ピボット(旋回)橋.
2 (一般に)軸, 支え;中心
He is the pivot of the baseball team.
彼はその野球チームの中心選手だ.
3 軸兵:隊列が旋回するときの基準となる人.
4 《ダンス》片足旋回;《バスケット》ピボット.
━━[動](自)
1 旋回心軸で回転する.
2 [pivot on [upon] A]〈A(物)を〉支点に回転する, 向きを変える;〈A(事)によって〉決まる
pivot on one's heels
かかとを軸にして回る.
━━(他)…を旋回軸上にのせる;…を回転させる.
[古フランス語pivot]

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