2013年9月14日 星期六

bolster, encryption, incoming, outgoing, ingress, due diligence

 In China, the Dangers of Due Diligence

By JANE PERLEZ

Background checks, audits and other investigations are just part of doing business in most countries, but in China those jobs can pose big risks.



Legislation Seeks to Bar N.S.A. Tactic in Encryption

By SCOTT SHANE and NICOLE PERLROTH

A congressman's proposal would prohibit the agency from installing "back doors" into encryption, the electronic scrambling that protects e-mail and other communications.


From the time elapsing between the ingress of the beast and the screams, it seems probable that it was not immediately perceived.




2 MAJOR RULINGS BOLSTER GAY MARRIAGE

Court Voids U.S. Law and Clears Way for Vows in California
Decisions Seen as Landmark Victories For Gay Rights

By THE NEW YORK TIMES 10:27 AM ET
The Supreme Court issued a pair of rulings Wednesday expanding gay rights, ruling unconstitutional a 1996 law denying federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples and clearing the way for California to legalize same-sex marriage.
 Software Sales Bolster Microsoft, Leading to a 19% Rise in Profit

By NICK WINGFIELD

Despite a slump in global sales of personal computers, the company said its software product sales drove the increase, which exceeded Wall Street estimates.

Japan's Incoming Leader Noda Oversaw Biggest Yen Intervention Since 2004
Bloomberg
Yoshihiko Noda, president of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), standing third from left, is applauded after being elected Japan's prime minister at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo, Japan, on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011. ...



Wheatley, the outgoing head of Hong Kong's securities market regulator, said Tuesday that some sponsors' due diligence of initial public offerings has been "inadequate."


Tough Test Emerges as Administration Aims to Bolster Automakers, Cut Pollution


Gmail now even more secure: HTTPS by default

HTTPS encryption keeps your mail secure as it travels between your web browser and Gmail servers, so someone sharing your favorite coffee shop's public wifi can't maliciously read it. Banks and credit card companies use this same protocol to keep your online accounts safe. To protect your Gmail account, we've turned on the option to "always use HTTPS" for everyone. This added layer of security can make Gmail slower, so if you don't use unencrypted wireless connections, you can choose to disable this option in your account Settings. Even if you change this setting, Gmail will always encrypt the login page to protect your password. Learn more




U.S. Unveils Plan to Aid Mortgage Giants

The federal government unveiled a broad program yesterday evening to bolster troubled mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, extending unprecedented support to the companies and proposing new authority to lend them money and even buy their stock.
(By Neil Irwin and Jeffrey H. Birnbaum, The Washington Post) 參考 shore sth up

Random House Audio plans to begin publishing its titles without encryption protection in a bid to bolster sales by attracting new retail outlets.


And when the Little, Small, Wee Bear came to look at his bed, there was the bolster in its place, and the pillow in its place upon the bolster, ...  

The long-dominant United States and fast-growing China are both seeking to bolster their naval power in the region. 



It is absurd for China to think that any Taiwanese leader would not want to bolster his country’s defenses when Beijing is modernizing its arsenal and stationing more than 1,000 missiles across the Taiwan Strait.


ingress

Pronunciation: /ˈɪngrɛs/


noun

  • 1 [mass noun] the action or fact of going in or entering; the capacity or right of entrance.
  • a place or means of access; an entrance.
  • [mass noun] the unwanted introduction of water, foreign bodies, contaminants, etc..
  • 2 Astronomy & Astrology the arrival of the sun, moon, or a planet in a specified constellation or part of the sky.
  • the beginning of a transit.


Derivatives




ingression


Pronunciation: /ɪnˈgrɛʃ(ə)n/
noun

Origin:

late Middle English (in the sense 'an entrance or beginning'): from Latin ingressus, from the verb ingredi 'enter'

bolster[bol・ster]

  • レベル:大学入試程度
  • 発音記号[bóulstər]

[名]
1 (枕の下に敷く)長枕;(一般に)枕(pillow).
2 枕状の物.
3 (摩擦・重圧をやわらげる)当て物, 受け台;補強材.
━━[動](他)
1 〈学説などを〉支持する;…を(質的に)強める;〈人を〉元気づける((up))
bolster (up) the soldiers' morale
兵士の士気を鼓舞する.
2 …を枕[物]で支える;補強する.
3 …に詰め物をする.
bol・ster・er
[名]


Definition of bolster


noun

  • 1a long, thick pillow that is placed under other pillows for support.
  • 2a part on a vehicle or tool providing structural support or reducing friction.
  • Building a short timber cap over a post designed to increase the bearing of the beams it supports.

verb

[with object]
  • 1 support or strengthen:the fall in interest rates is starting to bolster confidence
  • 2 provide (a seat) with padded support: (as adjective bolstered)I snuggled down into the heavily bolstered seat







Derivatives


bolsterer

noun

bolster (SUPPORT) Show phonetics
verb [T]
to support or improve something or make it stronger:
More money is needed to bolster the industry.
She tried to bolster my confidence/morale (= encourage me and make me feel stronger) by telling me that I had a special talent.
They need to do something to bolster their image.

bolster

(bōl'stər) pronunciation
n.
A long narrow pillow or cushion.
tr.v., -stered, -ster·ing, -sters.
  1. To support or prop up with or as if with a long narrow pillow or cushion.
  2. To buoy up or hearten: Visitors bolstered the patient's morale.
[Middle English, from Old English.]
n. - 長枕, 靠枕, 墊枕, 墊子
v. tr. - 支撐, 援助, 加固, 支持
日本語 (Japanese)
n. - 長まくら, クッション, 当て物, 枕, 長枕
v. - 支える, 支援する, 支持する, 強める

encryption
(en′krip·shən) (computer science) The coding of a clear text message by a transmitting unit so as to prevent unauthorized eavesdropping along the transmission line; the receiving unit uses the same algorithm as the transmitting unit to decode the incoming message.

 big lie
also Big Lie
n. Repeated distortion of the truth on a grand scale, especially for propaganda purposes: released falsified documents to bolster the big lie that no government troops were involved in the fighting.



incoming

(ĭn'kŭm'ĭng) pronunciation
adj.
  1. Coming in or about to come in: incoming trains; incoming mail; incoming mortar fire.
  2. About to assume an office or position: the incoming governor.
n.
  1. The act of coming in; arrival.
  2. Income; revenue. Often used in the plural.

due diligence

Syllabification: (due dil·i·gence)

noun

Law
  • reasonable steps taken by a person in order to satisfy a legal requirement, especially in buying or selling something.
  • a comprehensive appraisal of a business undertaken by a prospective buyer, especially to establish its assets and liabilities and evaluate its commercial potential.

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