2018年3月2日 星期五

have a knack for, over- leveraged, lever, backwardness, leverage, deleveraging, yank, Social Networks





Fiscal entitlements are too secure in Brazil. But in Russia, property rights are not secure enough
Russia's credit rating rises; Brazil's falls
Sanctions can be good for deleveraging
ECONOMIST.COM




On a rollercoaster, riders climb upwards slowly, their suspense building, then plunge downwards quickly, their stomachs lagging a little behind. In its deleveraging efforts, China’s government hopes to do the opposite






Credit growth in China is causing jitters
But it’s wrong to assume that reining it in will slow down the economy
ECONOMIST.COM


Today's ‪#‎Dailychart‬ reveals that American homeowners are finally returning to positive equity. Housing equity has shot up in recent months, as prices have started to recover nationwide. And mortgage debt has declined steadily as households have deleveraged, often because banks have yanked their credit lines http://econ.st/18UjOg5



After Big Bet, Hedge Fund Pulls the Levers of Power

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT, ERIC LIPTON and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON
The activist hedge fund manager William A. Ackman bet a billion dollars on the collapse of the nutritional supplement company Herbalife, then launched an extraordinary campaign to hasten that development.



Social Networks Spread Iranian Defiance Online 
By BRAD STONE and NOAM COHEN 
Social media sites are challenging levers of state media control and allowing Iranians to find novel ways around restrictions.


The U.K.'s Great Bank-Overhaul Gamble

One might have expected George Osborne to avoid anything that might accelerate the pace of U.K. financial-sector deleveraging. Instead, he is plowing ahead with bank-overhaul proposals.


During the Clinton years, US military power was at its height and the country was experiencing its strongest ever business expansion. America's information technology was changing the world and its chief executives were regarded as global leaders. China, on the other hand, was just emerging from backwardness. It was logical for America's China policy to be heavily bilateral. The US had the leverage to press China to open markets and deregulate banks. Centre stage was the creation of a Joint Committee on Commerce and Trade and a similar forum for financial matters.



在克林顿任内,美国军事实力处于鼎盛时期,而且正在经历 有史以来最强劲的商业扩张。当时美国的信息技术正改变着世界,美国企业的首席执行官们被奉为全球领 袖。而另一方面,中国刚刚从落后中崛起。因此,美国对华政策具有浓重的双边色彩是符合逻辑的。美国有迫使中国开放市场、放松银行监管的资本。中美商贸联合 委员会(Joint Committee on Commerce and Trade)以及一个类似金融事务论坛的创立,占据了中美关系舞台的中心。





Working paper: Vulnerable Banks

Regulators have been frustrated in identifying risk exposures at the largest and most levered financial institutions. Robin Greenwood, Augustin Landier, and David Thesmar show simple ways to understand how deleveraging scenarios could play out.



leverage[lev・er・age]
発音記号[lévəridʒ | líːv-]
(lĕv'ər-ĭj, lē'vər-) pronunciation
n.
The action of a lever.
The mechanical advantage of a lever.
Positional advantage; power to act effectively: "started his . . . career with far more social leverage than his father had enjoyed" (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
The use of credit or borrowed funds to improve one's speculative capacity and increase the rate of return from an investment, as in buying securities on margin.
tr.v., -aged, -ag·ing, -ag·es.

To provide (a company) with leverage.
To supplement (money, for example) with leverage.
To improve or enhance: "It makes more sense to be able to leverage what we [public radio stations] do in a more effective way to our listeners" (Delano Lewis).




[名][U]

1 行動力;効力;影響力.

2 てこの作用;てこ装置;てこ比.

3 《経営》レバレッジ:買収予定の会社を担保とした借入.

━━[動](他)〈人・法人に〉借入金で投機をさせる.


lever
n.

A simple machine consisting of a rigid bar pivoted on a fixed point and used to transmit force, as in raising or moving a weight at one end by pushing down on the other.
A projecting handle used to adjust or operate a mechanism.
A means of accomplishing; a tool: used friendship as a lever to obtain advancement.
tr.v., -ered, -er·ing, -ers.

To move or lift with or as if with a lever.

[Middle English, from Old French levier, from lever, to raise, from Latin levāre, from levis, light.]



lever
Syllabification: lev·er

Pronunciation: /ˈlevər, ˈlēvər/

noun
1A rigid bar resting on a pivot, used to help move a heavy or firmly fixed load with one end when pressure is applied to the other.

More example sentencesSynonyms

1.1A projecting arm or handle that is moved to operate a mechanism: she pulled a lever at the base of the cage

More example sentencesSynonyms

1.2A means of exerting pressure on someone to act in a particular way: rich countries increasingly use foreign aid as a lever to promote political pluralism

More example sentences

verb
[with object] Back to top  
1Lift or move with a lever: she levered the lid off the pot with a screwdriver

More example sentencesSynonyms

1.1Move (someone or something) with a concerted physical effort: she levered herself up against the pillows

More example sentences

1.2 [no object] Use a lever: the men got hold of the coffin and levered at it with crowbars

1.3Pressurize (someone) to do something: another sticking point is the money that will be required to lever the unions into accepting a deal

More example sentences

Origin
Middle English: from Old French levier, leveor, from lever 'to lift'.




deleveraging


Pronunciation: /diːˈliːv(ə)rɪdʒɪŋ, diːˈlɛv(ə)rɪdʒɪŋ/


noun

[mass noun] Finance
  • the process or practice of reducing the level of one’s debt by rapidly selling one’s assets.

Derivatives




deleverage

noun & verb



leverage
n.

    1. The action of a lever.
    2. The mechanical advantage of a lever.
  1. Positional advantage; power to act effectively: “started his . . . career with far more social leverage than his father had enjoyed” (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
  2. The use of credit or borrowed funds to improve one's speculative capacity and increase the rate of return from an investment, as in buying securities on margin.
tr.v., -aged, -ag·ing, -ag·es.
    1. To provide (a company) with leverage.
    2. To supplement (money, for example) with leverage.
  1. To improve or enhance: “It makes more sense to be able to leverage what we [public radio stations] do in a more effective way to our listeners” (Delano Lewis).


knack

  1. A clever, expedient way of doing something.
  2. A specific talent for something, especially one difficult to explain or teach. See synonyms at art1.
  3. Archaic.
    1. A cleverly designed device.
    2. A knickknack.
[Middle English knakke, from Middle Dutch cnacken, to strike, crack, probably of imitative origin.]


http://www.libertytimes.com.tw/2009/new/aug/31/today-int9.htm
Despite moving in such glamorous circles, Leibovitz has never been known for having a knack for finance. In what now appears as a disastrous decision to raise funds, Leibovitz took a 24-million-dollar loan from Art Capital Group (ACG) in December 2008 using her own photographs as collateral.
儘管遊走如此光鮮亮麗的圈子,萊波維茨向來就不善理財。在一項現在看來顯然是災難性的募資決定中,萊波維茨2008年12月以她的照片當抵押品,向「藝術資本集團」貸款2400萬美元。
That debt is due September 8 and if she can’t pay up, the over-leveraged photographer could lose her life’s work.
這筆債務將在9月8日到期,如果屆時她無法償還,這名過度借貸的攝影師可能失去她的畢生心血。
新聞辭典

over- leveraged:形容詞,過度借貸的、財務槓桿操作過頭的。例句:Some over-leveraged enterprisers went broke during this economic crisis.(有些財務槓桿操作過頭的企業家在這波經濟危機中破產。)


have a knack for:片語,擅長某項技能,特別是指能輕而易舉完成某種難以學習的事情。例句:Since when did you have a knack for picking up girls?(你什麼時候開始懂得把妹了?)



yank

Pronunciation: /jaŋk/
informal
Translate yank | into French | into German | into Italian | into Spanish

verb

[with object]
  • pull with a jerk:her hair was yanked, and she screamed he yanked her to her feet [no object]:Liz yanked at her arm

noun

[in singular]
  • a sudden hard pull:one of the other girls gave her ponytail a yank

Origin:

late 18th century (as a Scots word in the sense 'sudden sharp blow'): of unknown origin

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