2016年1月14日 星期四

gossip hangove, gossipy, takedown, denizen, McColo

Ever had a gossip hangover?

Sadie Stein on the day-after-dish symptoms.
THEPARISREVIEW.ORG|由 SADIE STEIN 上傳

This is the best takedown of Kim Davis you'll see


The Nightly Show is back and over the trend of "just speaking your mind".
ALTERNET.ORG
Google report sheds light on copyright takedown requests
Computerworld
The report shows that Google received a total of 1255402 URL removal requests via its web form in the last one month alone. The number does not include removal requests made via other channels such as faxes and written letter.



'Breakfast With Lucian'

By GEORDIE GREIG
Reviewed by FRANCINE PROSE
A gossipy account of Lucian Freud's life.



For many denizens of Silicon Valley, the bidding war for storage-device maker Data Domain is more than a takeover battle -- it's a clash of cultures.


Google: Spam Volume Returns To Pre-mccolo Levels
ChannelWeb - Manhasset,NY,USA
Spam volumes have finally returned to the same high levels seen prior to the November mccolo ISP takedown, according to a Google Postini report. ...

BUSINESS

Wall St.'s Denizens Look East
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Fahad al-Deweesh, a vice president at a Persian Gulf investment firm, is getting e-mails from old finance classmates at the University of Southern California he hasn't heard from in years, asking what the job market here looks like for Americans.
(By Ellen Knickmeyer, The Washington Post)



TOP STORY

James Cayne
Bear Stearns chief executive James Cayne is apt to be the talk of Wall Street on Thursday, as industry insiders gape over a long, unflattering and at times highly gossipy profile of him in The Wall Street Journal. The account, which tops 3,000 words and makes repeated use of unnamed sources, portrays him as an out-of-touch leader with a penchant for pot smoking who is more interested in his bridge and golf games than tending to his firm's recent crises.
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Already, Wall Street denizens are speculating about whether Mr. Cayne's former lieutenant and fellow bridge enthusiast, Warren Spector, might have had a hand in the story.

The Journal article leads with an account of 10 days in July that Mr. Cayne spent at a bridge tournament in Nashville, Tenn., even as two of Bear's hedge funds were staggering toward what would eventually become twin bankruptcy filings. He was "without a cellphone or an email device" during the trip, the Journal said.

The article also said he sometimes caps a day of bridge with a joint, including during a trip to Memphis in 2004. In a short interview with the Journal, Mr. Cayne wouldn't address general questions about pot smoking but said there was "zero chance" that the story about the Memphis trip was true.

Mr. Cayne's weekly golf outings in New Jersey over the summer -- a period of extreme turmoil at his firm -- have been widely reported. Bear Stearns maintains that he is in contact with the office while off site, something that Samuel Molinaro Jr., Bear's chief operating and financial officer, repeated in Thursday's profile: "I've never had a problem reaching him," he told the Journal.

Mr. Cayne has other defenders in the article, including David Winters, a former chief of mutual-fund firm Franklin Mutual Advisers, who calls him a "great captain." It also points out that Mr. Cayne traveled to China over the Labor Day weekend to help seal a partnership with a Beijing investment bank.



take·down (tāk'doun') pronunciation
adj.
Having the capability of being taken down or apart: a takedown rifle; a takedown scaffold.
n.
    1. An article or apparatus that can be taken down or apart.
    2. The mechanism that allows an article or apparatus to be easily taken down.
  1. Sports. A move or maneuver in wrestling or the martial arts in which a standing opponent is forced to the floor.
  2. Informal.
    1. The act of humiliating a person.
    2. An instance of such humiliation: She gave you quite a takedown.
  1. [形]分解[組立]式の.
  1. ━━[名][U][C]
  2. 1 取りはずし,分解.
  3. 2 分解(のきく)銃器;(その)分解部分.
  4. 3 ((略式))屈辱

McColo was an Internet service provider providing service to malware and botnet operators. At the time of termination of its upstream service on November 11, 2008, it was estimated that McColo customers were responsible for a substantial proportion of all email spam then flowing[1] and subsequent reports claim a two-thirds or greater reduction in global spam volume.[2] This reduction has been sustained for some period after the takedown. McColo was one of the leading players in the so-called "bulletproof hosting" market — ISPs that will allow servers to remain online regardless of complaints.

den・i・zen



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━━ n. 住民; 〔英〕 英国籍取得者; 外来語; 外来動[植]物; 帰化人.



gossip

Pronunciation: /ˈgɒsɪp/
Translate gossip | into French | into German | into Italian | into Spanish


noun

[mass noun]
  • casual or unconstrained conversation or reports about other people, typically involving details which are not confirmed as true:he became the subject of much local gossip
  • [count noun] a conversation about other people; an instance of gossiping:she just comes round here for a gossip
  • [count noun] chiefly derogatory a person who likes talking about other people’s private lives.

verb (gossips, gossiping, gossiped)

[no object]
  • engage in gossip:they would start gossiping about her as soon as she left

Derivatives
gossiper
noun
gossipy
adjective

Origin:

late Old English godsibb, 'godfather, godmother, baptismal sponsor', literally 'a person related to one in God', from god 'God' + sibb 'a relative' (see sib). In Middle English the sense was 'a close friend, a person with whom one gossips', hence 'a person who gossips', later (early 19th century) 'idle talk' (from the verb, which dates from the early 17th century)

Spelling rule

Do not double the final consonant when adding endings which begin with a vowel to a word which ends in a vowel plus a consonant, if the stress is not at the end of the word (as in target): (gossips, gossiping, gossiped).

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