2017年6月5日 星期一

badass, rollicking, picaresques, swashbuckling, critter, duke it out, put up your dukes, petri dish

Indium. Possibly an even more badass metal than gallium.
Source: Glamsci
1,419,423 次觀看
MEL Science
If you bend a piece of indium metal, it gives a high-pitched squeak. Once you’ve heard it, you’ll never forget it.
More about indium: https://goo.gl/lL608P
Cool and safe chemistry experiments: https://goo.gl/V825FG

Not every classical composer was tried for witchcraft, but he was.

He murdered his wife and her lover. But it is for glorious music, not grisly crimes, that we should remember Gesualdo.
BBC.COM


Instead of keeping webs, Portia jumping spiders leap through the jungle in search of prey. Terrifying, badass, or both?!
Catch up on the latest episode of ‪#‎TheHunt‬ >>bit.ly/WatchTheHuntEpisode3

The book is set in a 14th-century Italian monastery where monks are being murdered by their co-religionists bent on concealing a long-lost philosophical treatise by Aristotle. Despite devoting whole chapters to discussions of Christian theology and heresies, Mr. Eco managed to enthrall a mass audience with the book, a rollicking detective thriller.



Squirrels have been known to make "jerky" by leaving hanging pieces of mushroom out to dry.

January 21 marks Squirrel Appreciation Day, a day dedicated to celebrating and protecting our favorite bushy-tailed critters.
WWW.DISCOVERY.COM




"Having amassed a huge pot of money from all those superhero movies, Marvel can afford to have a bit of fun and take some risks, and the result is this irrepressibly rollicking space romp – which is likely to fill those coffers even more" (via Guardian film)

Guardians of the Galaxy review – a whip-smart space romp
A new troupe of intergalactic comedy badasses sets out to save the...
THEGUARDIAN.COM|由 STEVE ROSE 上傳





Taiwan parliament dukes it out over nuclear plant Washington Post
Taiwan parliament dukes it out over nuclear plant ... Members of Taiwan's parliament threw punches and sprayed water at each other ahead of a vote on a new ...


A GOOD way to make yourself unpopular at dinner parties is to point out that a typical person is, from a microbiologist’s perspective, a walking, talking Petri dish. An extraordinary profusion of microscopic critters inhabit every crack and crevice of the typical human, so many that they probably outnumber the cells of the body upon and within which they dwell.



Look-Alike Wines Featuring Look-Alike Marsupials Duke It Out
Two big makers of so-called critter wines lately aren't looking so warm and fuzzy. The producer of Yellow Tail has filed a lawsuit in a New York federal court accusing the maker of Little Roo of trademark infringement.




Arts on the Air | 13.08.2008 | 05:30
This year’s Shakespeare Festival in Neuss with a Japanese production

Throughout the month long Shakespeare Festival, German audiences will be able to witness for the first time an exciting production of The Winter’s Tale by Japanese director Yoshihiro Kurita in the aesthetic spirit of Noh theatre.

Every summer, the city of Neuss near Düsseldorf attracts international theatre companies to perform in its Shakespeare Globe Theatre. The venue is a reconstruction of the famous Globe Theatre in London and each year the immortal works of the Bard are performed and given new life there. This year the festival was opened by the Bremer Shakespeare Company and its production of the rollicking, humorous comedy All's Well that Ends Well. The festival started on the 14th of July and runs until the 23rd of August.
Report: Cheryl Northey



British novelist Fraser diesGeorge MacDonald Fraser, a British writer whose popular novels about the arch-rogue Harry Flashman followed their hero as he galloped, swashbuckled, drank and womanized his way through many of the signal events of the 19th century, died on Wednesday on the Isle of Man. He was 82 and had made his home there in recent years. The cause was cancer, said Vivienne Schuster, his British literary agent. Over nearly four decades, Fraser produced a dozen rollicking picaresques centering on Flashman.




badass 

Pronunciation: /ˈbadas/ 

North American informal


NOUN

1A tough, uncompromising, or intimidating person:one of them is a real badass, the other’s pretty friendly
1.1A formidably impressive person:she is so wonderful, so sweet, so rad, so amazing; she’s a badass

ADJECTIVE

1Tough, uncompromising, or intimidating:a badass demeanour
1.1Impressive; excellent:this was one badass camera

womanizeUK USUALLY womanise
verb [I] DISAPPROVING
A man who womanizes frequently has temporary sexual relationships with women or tries to get women to have sex with him:
He drank, womanized and wasted money.

womanizingUK USUALLY womanising 
noun [U] DISAPPROVING
Both his first and second wife divorced him on account of his womanizing.

womanizerUK USUALLY womaniser
noun [C] DISAPPROVING
He was a gambler, a womanizer and a drunk.


swashbuckling
 
adjective [before noun]
behaving in a brave and exciting way, especially like a fighter in the past:
a swashbuckling hero/pirate
The players displayed a swashbuckling confidence.rollicking
adjective [before noun] OLD-FASHIONED
cheerful and energetic:
The play is described as 'a rollicking tale about love and lust'.


swash・buckler


から威張りする軍人; 向こうみずな男.
swash・buckling a., n. から威張り(する).



 pic・a・resque



━━ a. 悪漢ものの ((小説など)).
━━ n. (the ~) 悪漢もの[小説].


duke

Pronunciation: /djuːk/
Translate duke | into French | into German | into Italian | into Spanish
noun




  • 1a male holding the highest hereditary title in the British and certain other peerages.
  • chiefly historical (in some parts of Europe) a male ruler of a small independent state.
  • 2 (dukes) informal the fists, especially when raised in a fighting attitude.
    [from rhyming slang Duke of Yorks 'forks' (= fingers)]

verb

[no object] (duke it out) North American informal
  • fight it out.

Origin:

Old English (denoting the ruler of a duchy), from Old French duc, from Latin dux, duc- 'leader'; related to ducere 'to lead'
duke it out: fight, esp. with fists; do battle

Meaning

Put up your fists and prepare to fight.
put up your dukes

















Being less dependent on geography, New World wines have placed more emphasis on branding as a marketing tool, following the example set by Germany's Blue Nun and Portugal's Mateus Rosé, brands created in 1927 and in 1942 respectively. One particular style of branding has been the 'critter wines' that use animals on their labels. Without the partible inheritance of the Napoleonic code to worry about, New World vineyards tend to be very much bigger than those in say Burgundy, which has allowed economies of scale and a better ability to negotiate with mass market retailers. With supermarkets selling an increasing proportion of wine in many markets, New World producers are better positioned to take advantage of this trend towards high volumes and low margins.

new-world-wine
A reference to non-European wine-producing countries such as argentina, australia, chile, new zealand, south africa and the united states. New World wine techniques are modern, science-based viticulture and viniculture methods, although the differences are rapidly disappearing. See also old world wine.




critter
(krĭt'ər) pronunciation
n. Informal
  1. A living creature.
  2. A domestic animal, especially a cow, horse, or mule.
  3. A person.
[Alteration of CREATURE.]
REGIONAL NOTE Critter, a pronunciation spelling of creature, actually reflects a pronunciation that would have been very familiar to Shakespeare: 16th- and 17th-century English had not yet begun to pronounce the -ture suffix with its modern (ch) sound. This archaic pronunciation still exists in American critter and in Irish creature, pronounced (krā'tŭr) and used in the same senses as the American word. The most common meaning of critter is "a living creature," whether wild or domestic; it also can mean "a child" when used as a term of sympathetic endearment, or it can mean "an unfortunate person." In old-fashioned speech, critter and beast denoted a large domestic animal. The more restricted senses "a cow," "a horse," or "a mule" are still characteristic of the speech in specific regions of the United States. The use of critter among younger speakers almost always carries with it a jocular or informal connotation.
The rollicking adventures of the Stone family on a tour of the Solar System. It all started when the twins, Castor and Pollux Stone, decided that life on the Lunar colony was too dull and decided to buy their own spaceship and go into business for themselves. Their father thought that was a fine idea, except that he and Grandma Hazel bought the spaceship and the whole Stone family were on their way out into the far reaches of the Solar System, with stops on Mars (where the twins got a lesson in the interplanetary economics of bicycles and the adorable little critters called flatcats who, it turned out, bred like rabbits; or, perhaps, Tribbles . . .), out to the asteroids, where Mrs. Stone, an M.D., was needed to treat a dangerous outbreak of disease, and even further out, to Titan and beyond.
Unforgettable Heinlein characters on an unforgettable adventure.
critter
n. Informal
  1. A living creature.
  2. A domestic animal, especially a cow, horse, or mule.
  3. A person.
[Alteration of CREATURE.]
REGIONAL NOTE Critter, a pronunciation spelling of creature, actually reflects a pronunciation that would have been very familiar to Shakespeare: 16th- and 17th-century English had not yet begun to pronounce the -ture suffix with its modern (ch) sound. This archaic pronunciation still exists in American critter and in Irish creature, pronounced (krā'tŭr) and used in the same senses as the American word. The most common meaning of critter is "a living creature," whether wild or domestic; it also can mean "a child" when used as a term of sympathetic endearment, or it can mean "an unfortunate person." In old-fashioned speech, critter and beast denoted a large domestic animal. The more restricted senses "a cow," "a horse," or "a mule" are still characteristic of the speech in specific regions of the United States. The use of critter among younger speakers almost always carries with it a jocular or informal connotation.



rollicking








Line breaks: rol¦lick|ing
Pronunciation: /ˈrɒlɪkɪŋ /







ADJECTIVE

[ATTRIBUTIVE]
Exuberantly lively and amusing:this is all good rollicking fun

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