2016年2月9日 星期二

disposition, egregious, indisposed, hymeneal, dramatis personae, deferential





英國外相:如果有香港人在香港被擄走至另一司法區並在該處面對起訴,那將是對一國兩制、《基本法》及《中英聯合聲明》的「極嚴重違反」(egregious breach)
"Humanizing fetuses" has to be one of the most egregious instances of 1984ish newspeak I've seen in a while.

A Doritos ad depicting a hungry, unborn baby upset abortion rights…
THEFEDERALIST.COM



[Join this page for Joyce!]


His account of that night was full of egregious lies, and I was astonished that anyone could believe his testimony.

Twitter Shows Its Rude Side
By HENRY ALFORD

Nasty comments and bad manners on Twitter seem to be egregious expressions of insecurity.













Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us




How outrageous pricing and egregious profits are destroying our health care

"Several executives with NFL teams expressed the view that the media and others are focusing wrongly on the potential missteps by Goodell rather than on the misconduct of Rice."
"[But] it would take a lot. No one expects it to come to that," said one...
WASHINGTONPOST.COM

JPMorgan Trading Group Lost $2 Billion

Troubles at a JPMorgan Chase unit are likely to weigh on broader earnings. “These were egregious mistakes,” said Jamie Dimon, the bank’s chief, seen this month. 



 As the Secret Service pursues an inquiry into allegations of egregious behavior by agents on President Obama’s trip to Colombia, investigators have pieced together a more nuanced story.



His letter, which he wrote with his partner, implored his firm's investors to vote against the re-election of one of Goldman Sachs's most prominent board members, James A. Johnson, a former chief executive of Fannie Mae. Mr. Poppe characterized Mr. Johnson's tenure as being "at the center of several egregious corporate governance debacles." Mr. Johnson also is a board member of Target, and Mr. Poppe also advises his investors to vote against his re-election if he is nominated again.




He did not say that he had shown it parentally while the tragedy was threatening, or at least there was danger of a precipitate descent from the levels of comedy. The parents of hymeneal men and women he was indisposed to consider as dramatis personae. Nor did he mention certain sympathetic regrets he entertained in contemplation of the health of Mr. Dale, for whom, poor gentleman, the proffer of a bottle of the Patterne Port would be an egregious mockery. He paced about, anxious for his departure, and seeming better pleased with the society of Colonel De Craye than with that of any of the others. Colonel De Craye assiduously courted him, was anecdotal, deferential, charmingly vivacious, the very man the Rev. Doctor liked for company when plunged in the bustle of the preliminaries to a journey.


Questions Are Raised About Firing of Soprano
By DANIEL J. WAKIN
In the ego-driven arena of opera, “indisposed” is the main euphemism used when a singer is replaced, whatever the real reason.


 The apology was accepted with a smile.  I repeated the
offence with less ceremony; the excuse was admitted with the same
indulgence: the slightest motive of laziness or indisposition, the
most trifling avocation at home or abroad, was allowed as a worthy
impediment; nor did my tutor appear conscious of my absence or
neglect.  Had the hour of lecture been constantly filled, a single
hour was a small portion of my academic leisure.

indispose Pronunciation (verb) Make unwilling.
Synonyms:disincline
Usage:I did not wish to indispose him still further by an appearance of marked curiosity.

disposition
dɪspəˈzɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
  1. 1.
    a person's inherent qualities of mind and character.
    "a sweet-natured girl of a placid disposition"
    synonyms:temperamentnaturecharacterconstitutionmake-upgrainhumour,tempermentality, turn of mind;
    informalkidney
    "the book is not recommended to readers of a nervous disposition"

  2. 2.
    the way in which something is placed or arranged, especially in relation to other things.
    "the plan shows the disposition of the rooms"
    synonyms:arrangement, arranging, disposal, ordering, positioning, placement, lining up, setting up, organizationconfigurationMore
hy·me·ne·al ('mə-nē'əl) pronunciation
adj.
Of or relating to a wedding or marriage.

n.
  1. A wedding song or poem.
  2. hymeneals Archaic. A wedding; nuptials.
[From Latin hymenaeus, wedding song, wedding, from Greek humenaios, from Humēn, Hymen, from humēn, membrane. See hymen.]

[形]結婚の, 婚姻の.
━━[名]結婚の歌;((〜s))((古))結婚式.hymeneally hy'me·ne'al·ly adv.




dram·a·tis per·so·nae (drăm'ə-tĭs pər-sō'nē, drä'mə-tĭs pər-sō'') pronunciation
pl.n.
  1. The characters in a play or story.
  2. A list of the characters in a play or story.
[Latin drāmatis, genitive of drāma, drama + persōnae, pl. of persōna, character.]


proffer

tr.v., -fered, -fer·ing, -fers.
To offer for acceptance; tender. See synonyms at offer.

n.
The act of proffering; an offer.
[Middle English profren, from Old French poroffrir, profrir : por-, forth (from Latin prō-; see pro-1) + offrir, to offer (from Latin offerre; see offer).]
profferer prof'fer·er n.


Definition of egregious
adjective
  • 1 outstandingly bad; shocking:egregious abuses of copyright
  • 2 archaic remarkably good.

Derivatives

egregiously

adverb

egregiousness

noun
egregious

 
音節
e • gre • gious
発音
igríːdʒəs
adj.
Conspicuously bad or offensive. See synonyms at flagrant.
[形]((通例限定))((形式))((悪い意味の言葉を伴って))とんでもない, とてもひどい
an egregious ass [fool, idiot]
大ばか者.
[ラテン語ēgregius(ē離れた+grex群). △GREGARIOUS
[From Latin ēgregius, outstanding : ē-, ex-, ex- + grex, greg-, herd.]
egregiously e·gre'gious·ly adv.
egregiousness e·gre'gious·ness n.




deferential
Marked by courteous submission or respect: duteous, dutiful, obeisant, respectful. Seeresist/yield.

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