2016年8月16日 星期二

tether, weak link, forge alliances, untethered, Oculus Rift

Today there are essentially just two competing headsets: Facebook’s Oculus Rift and HTC's Vive. Bring on a third.
A new headset design from Intel brings your hands into virtual spaces.
TECHNOLOGYREVIEW.COM|由 TOM SIMONITE 上傳

Out of this world: tethered by a safety cable, American astronaut Rex Walheim tinkers with the exterior of the ISS's Columbus Laboratory Module.


On March 18, 1965, the first spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov left his Voskhod 2 capsule and remained outside the spacecraft for 20 minutes, secured by a tether.

Verizon promises tethering for Droid
CNET News
Tethering will not be available on the new Google Android phone when it hits stores on Friday. But Brenda Raney, Verizon Wireless's spokeswoman said it is ...
Europe's Leaders Pursue New Pact
Euro-zone leaders are negotiating a potentially groundbreaking fiscal pact aimed at preventing the currency bloc from fracturing by tethering its members even closer together.


ON THIS DAY

On Feb. 7, 1984, space shuttle astronauts Bruce McCandless II and Robert L. Stewart went on the first untethered spacewalk.
HIGHER EDUCATION BUBBLE WILL BURST
Reminiscent of the recent stock market and real estate bubbles, escalating college prices are continuing to reach new heights. According to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, average tuition in the past two and a half decades has risen by 440 percent, which is more than four times the rate of inflation. While higher ed costs remain untethered to economic realities, students with college loans to pay off continue to graduate into abysmal job markets. Under the circumstances, it's easy to make the case that something has to give. The commentary is in U.S. News and World Report.




Sweeping Message in President’s Speech at Cairo University

President Obama pledged on Thursday to “seek a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world,” imploring each to drop their suspicions of one another and forge new alliances.



weak link
noun [C usually singular]
a weak part, especially the weakest part of something:
They're a fairly good team - their only weak link is a relatively inexperienced goalkeeper.
A chain can only be as strong as its weakest link, so we must look at the least committed country to see if the alliance will hold.WSJ 將weak link 翻譯成"軟肋"是"莫名其妙":
The Battery Is Your Laptop's Weak Link
2007年10月19日14:46
We talk about being mobile, part of a wireless world, untethered (OK, it's just me who says 'untethered'). But if, midflight and midsentence, you've ever cursed your laptop battery for giving out, or developed the habit, when you walk into Starbucks, of immediately peering under chairs and through people's legs for a power outlet, you'll know that the reality doesn't quite match the talk. Our laptops might be more portable than before, our connections might be faster and involve less cabling, but we know our batteries will let us down. We still need juice.

電池──筆記本電腦的軟肋
2007年10月19日14:46

們 對無拘無束的移動辦公環境無不心向往之。但如果你有過在飛行途中或一句話寫到一半時筆記本電腦的電池突然“罷工”的經歷﹐或是每當步入星巴克 (Starbucks)咖啡店時都會習慣成自然地往椅子腿下瞄﹐透過人們的腿叢去尋找電源插座﹐你就知道理想和現實並不是那麼匹配了。我們的筆記本電腦可 能比以往更輕便了﹐我們的上網速度或許也更快了﹐能夠無線上網的地方也更多了﹐但電池卻拖了我們的後腿。我們依然離不開電源插座。

alliance 聯盟.
    1. A close association of nations or other groups, formed to advance common interests or causes: an alliance of labor unions opposing the bill.
    2. A formal agreement establishing such an association, especially an international treaty of friendship.
  1. A connection based on kinship, marriage, or common interest; a bond or tie: the shifting alliances within a large family.
  2. Close similarity in nature or type; affinity: the ancient alliance between mathematics and music.
  3. The act of becoming allied or the condition of being allied: the church, acting in alliance with community groups.
[Middle English, from Old French aliance, from alier, to ally. See ally.]


***
untethered

pronunciation
IN BRIEF: adj. - Not confined or restricted with a leash.



tether
  • [téðər][名]
1 (動物の)つなぎ綱[鎖].
2 (体力・忍耐などの)限界
at the end of one's tether
体力[気力, 忍耐]が尽きて.
━━[動](他)〈動物を〉(…に)つなぎ綱でつなぐ;…を束縛する((to ...)).


tether
n.
    1. A rope, chain, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place, allowing a short radius in which it can move about.
    2. A similar ropelike restraint used as a safety measure, especially for young children and astronauts.
  1. A rope, chain, or similar restraint for holding one, especially an animal, in place, allowing a short radius in which one can move about.
  2. The extent or limit of one's resources, abilities, or endurance: drought-stricken farmers at the end of their tether.
tr.v.-ered-er·ing-ers.
To fasten or restrict with or as if with a tether.
[Middle English tedir, tethir, from Old Norse tjōdhr.]


Tethering is using a mobile device to gain Internet access for another device.[1]
Tethering works by connecting a device that can access the Internet, to another device that cannot. This can be done through Bluetooth wireless technology or cables (such as USB), allowing the device without built-in access to connect to the Internet, using the connected device as a modem.
Tethering has been used to gain access to the Internet since mobile devices started using their networks to give users Internet access, but has increased in prevalence due to Internet connectivity in modern cell phones and laptops. Initially, tethering was conducted primarily through USB or other cables. Since most modern cell phones are Bluetooth-enabled, however, wireless tethering through Bluetooth has largely replaced cable tethering.[citation needed]



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