2017年7月16日 星期日

bureaucracy, lightning, bureaucratic bottleneck, bottle, contrarian, laissez-faire

The second round of Brexit negotiations began in Brussels with an awkward photo opportunity.

Britain’s EU exit bill and citizens rights are likely to be discussed at this…
FT.COM
Bureaucracy
The hobo narrator of Harry McClintock’s 1928 song Big Rock Candy Mountain dreams of reaching a carefree paradise where “they hung the jerk who invented work”. While history may not remember the name of that particular “jerk”, we do know who the identity of the French economist who invented a word for something almost as tiresome”: ‘bureaucracy’. In 1818, Jean Claude Marie Vincent de Gournay tethered the French word for desk (bureau) to the Greek suffix that means ‘the power of’ (-cracy) and gave a name to the red tape that was beginning to strangle society. Having coined a word for the governmental processes that impose tedious rules on individual behaviour, Gournay might seem the last person we’d expect to give birth to a term that means “let people do as they think best”: laissez-faire.


Then, from 1973 to 2005, Mr. Safire wrote his twice-weekly “Essay” for the Op-Ed page of The Times, a forceful conservative voice in the liberal chorus. Unlike most Washington columnists who offer judgments with Olympian detachment, Mr. Safire was a pugnacious contrarian who did much of his own reporting, called people liars in print and laced his opinions with outrageous wordplay.



His dislike of bureaucracy was legendary and fit with his sometimes contrarian nature, said Dr. Michael Witherell, Fermilab's current director, who has a handwritten note from Dr. Wilson that reads in part: ''An all too common failing of large institutions is to fall into the bureaucratic morass -- complicated procedures, red tape and all that. That's terrible.''


Search For Truth: The next step... - Page 334 - Google Books Result

https://books.google.com.tw/books?isbn=0578166003
Bryan Radzin - 2015 - ‎Fiction
... the pipeline only took seven months, which wasn't fast enough to ease the summer drought, but was lightning fast when dealing with any sort of bureaucracy.


 lightning
 flash of bright light in the sky that is produced by electricitymoving between clouds or from clouds to the ground:
thunder and lightning
flash/bolt of lightning
That tree was struck by lightning.
She changed her clothes with lightning speed (= extremely quickly).


contrariann.
One who takes a contrary view or action, especially an investor who makes decisions that contradict prevailing wisdom, as in buying securities that are unpopular at the time.
contrarian contrarian adj.


bottleneck
 
noun [C]
1 a place where a road becomes narrow, or a place where there is often a lot of traffic, causing the traffic to slow down or stop:
Roadworks are causing bottlenecks in the city cent
2 a problem that delays progress:
Is there any way of getting round this bureaucratic bottleneck?
ボトルネック bottleneck】瓶頸
〔瓶の首の意〕
生産活動や文化活動などで,全体の円滑な進行・発展の妨げとなるような要素。隘路(あいろ)。障害。ネック。
Why IT often remains a bottleneck to growth
"A lot of other elements are in place," says Nick Holland, an analyst with Pyramid Research, CambridgeMass. "The latest block is the interface. That's the bottleneck."
Seattle-based ZenZui thinks it has a user-friendly approach.
re.
bureaucracy
noun [C or U] MAINLY DISAPPROVING
a system for controlling or managing a country, company or organization that is operated by a large number of officials who are employed to follow rules carefully:
I had to deal with the university's bureaucracy before I could change from one course to another.

bureaucrat 
noun [C]
someone working in a bureaucracy:
It turned out she was one of those faceless bureaucrats who control our lives.

bureaucratic 
adjective
I had a lot of bureaucratic hassle (= long and difficult dealings with officials) trying to get the information I needed.
The company was inefficient because it was highly bureaucratic.



bottle

(bŏt'lpronunciation
n.
  1. A receptacle having a narrow neck, usually no handles, and a mouth that can be plugged, corked, or capped.
  2. The quantity that a bottle holds.
  3. A receptacle filled with milk or formula that is fed, as to babies, in place of breast milk.
  4. Informal.
    1. Intoxicating liquor: Don't take to the bottle.
    2. The practice of drinking large quantities of intoxicating liquor: Her problem is the bottle.
tr.v.-tled-tling-tles.
  1. To place in a bottle.
  2. To hold in; restrain: bottled up my emotions.
[Middle English botel, from Old French botele, from Medieval Latin butticula, diminutive of Late Latin buttis, cask.]

bottleneck 
noun [C]
1 a place where a road becomes narrow, or a place where there is often a lot of traffic, causing the traffic to slow down or stop:
Roadworks are causing bottlenecks in the city centre.

2 a problem that delays progress:
Is there any way of getting round this bureaucratic bottleneck?


bot・tle



 
━━ n. 瓶(1本の量); 授乳瓶; 〔話〕 (the ~) 酒, 飲酒; 〔英俗〕 度胸.
 be on the bottle 酒びたりで.
 hit the bottle 〔俗〕 酒豪である.
 lose one's bottle 〔英俗〕 気後れする, ひるむ.
 over the [a] bottle 酒を飲みながら.
 take to the bottle 酒におぼれる.
━━ vt. 瓶に詰める ((up)).
 bottle out 怖じ気づく.
 bottle up (感情を)抑える; 封じ込める; (犯人を)捕える.
 bottle baby 人工栄養の乳児.
 bottle bank 〔英〕 (リサイクル用)空き瓶回収用容器.
 bot・tled ━━ a. 瓶詰めの.
 bottle-feed ━━ vt. 人工栄養[ミルク]で育てる.
bottle-fed a. ミルクで育った.
 bot・tle・ful ━━ n. ひと瓶(の量).
 bottle green 暗緑色.
 bottle・neck 隘路(あいろ); 障害; 瓶の首; 【楽】ボトルネック(奏法) ((ギターの弦の上を折った瓶の首やガラスの管を滑らせて音を出す)); 【コンピュータ】ボトルネック ((遅くなる原因の処理)).


 bottle・nose 【動】バンドウイルカ ((約3m)); とっくり[だんご]鼻.
 bottle opener 栓抜き.
 bottle party 酒持寄りのパーティー.
 bottle-washer 〔話〕 雑役夫, 下っぱ.

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