2017年3月31日 星期五

fool, publisher, April, April Fool, April Fool’s Day/April Fools' Day

Thank you for your attention, and for helping us with this project.
Sincerely,

Christine Leamon
Publisher
MIT Sloan Management Review

email: smr@mit.edu
phone: 617-253-7170
web: http://www.sloanreview.mit.edu



Motley Fool - USAIf Yahoo! ever wants to take on Google (Nasdaq: GOOG), it is going to have to become more attractive for publishers and website developers to turn to Yahoo! ...


這 publisher 也包括網路上的發表者.....
WordNet: publisher
Note: click on a word meaning below to see its connections and related words.
The noun has 3 meanings:
Meaning #1: a firm in the publishing business
Meaning #2: a person engaged in publishing periodicals or books or music
Meaning #3: the proprietor of a newspaper

 pub・lish・er

日本語 (Japanese)
n. - 発表者, 出版者, 発行者, 出版社, 新聞社主
━━ n. 出版(業)者; 発表者; 〔米〕 新聞社主.

Publishers Weekly パブリッシャーズ・ウィークリー ((米国の新刊紹介週刊誌)).


fool 丑角
Spotlight:
Buy Poster at AllPosters.com                      
Court Jesters
View Poster
"Better a witty fool than a foolish wit." So says Feste in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. Shakespeare indeed suffered fools gladly: he wrote of fools, populated his plays with them, and gave them some of his best lines. Consider: "Lord what fools these mortals be." That line comes from A Midsummer's Night's Dream, with the mischievous fairy Puck blaming the mortal lovers for actions that were actually brought on by his own mistake. In Shakespeare's As You Like It, Jacques cries, "A fool, A fool! I met a fool i' the forest, A motley fool" — the term motley referring to the multicolored dress of the jesters at that time. And, in The Merchant of Venice, the play's jester, Gratiano, defends himself with this sentiment, "Let me play the fool, With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come." Today is April Fool's Day.
Quote:
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool." — William ShakespeareAs You Like It
好消息!從下個星期開始,AIT每週五晚上都會舉行舞會!
別上當了,今天是愚人節!雖然愚人節不是官方節日,但是在美國每到4月1日,朋友間經常會互相捉弄,然後再說聲「April Fools」來表示只是開個愚人節玩笑。美國常見的愚人節惡作劇包括叫別人去做「傻瓜任務」,找一些根本不存在的東西;爸媽可能會在小孩的鞋子裡塞報紙,讓他們以為鞋子太小了,或是在早餐的時候端上晚餐才會吃的食物,或是用膠水讓牙膏打不開。除了惡作劇以外,電視、廣播、報紙、網站可能都會有一些精心設計的整人環節或愚人節玩笑,有些大公司也玩得很瘋。報章雜誌還會報導假新聞,然後在隔天澄清,或是在文章下方加一些小字說明。你曾在愚人節做過什麼樣的惡作劇?歡迎跟我們分享。#aprilfoolsday
Do you know that AIT will start to host a dance party every Friday night?! Just kidding - today is April Fools’ Day! In the United States this is not an official holiday, but a day when many friends play tricks and then say “April Fools!” to show that they are just kidding. Americans celebrate by playing pranks, sending someone on a “fool’s errand” to look for something that doesn’t exist. Parents might put newspaper in the slippers of children so they think their shoes are too small, or serve dinner foods for breakfast, or glue the top on the toothpaste. In addition to people playing pranks on one another on April Fools' Day, elaborate practical jokes have appeared on radio and TV stations, newspapers, web sites, and have been performed by large corporations. Some newspapers and magazines report false stories and then explain the next day, or in a small font below the story. What practical jokes have you played on someone for April Fool’s Day?

April FoolLine breaks: April Fool



Definition of April Fool in English:

noun

1A person who is the victim of a trick or hoax on April Fool’s Day.
1.1trick or hoax on April Fool’s Day:they were taken in by our April Fool
‪#‎AprilFools‬! April actually derives from the Latin word aperire, meaning 'to open' (i.e. spring) http://ow.ly/L4q7l


2017年3月30日 星期四

walk away, chemistry, trade-off, subculture, expatriate, out of order, traumatic, eat well or sleep well

British voters have been given wildly unrealistic expectations of the Utopia ahead. Their first contact with reality will be traumatic

The Brexit negotiations are sure to be complex and difficult
ECONOMIST.COM


To a great extent, increases in dementia are the price of progress: more and more people are living long enough to get Alzheimer’s, some because they survived heart disease, strokes or cancer. It is a cruel trade-off. The disease is by no means inevitable, but among people 85 and older, about 40 percent develop Alzheimer’s and spend their so-called golden years in a thicket of confusion, ultimately becoming incontinent, mute, bedridden or forced to use a wheelchair and completely dependent on othersk

Europe Without Borders Threatens Ex-Pats Without Visas


As of 2008, the Czech Republic will join the Schengen agreement, meaning that people with right papers can travel freely to most other EU nations. But that's created a hassle for one prominent subculture in Prague.




書名:最後的正義:美國聯邦最高法院的歷史,原文名稱:Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme…
BOOKS.COM.TW



walk away, chemistry

HBS Cases: Walking Away From a $3 Billion Deal

http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/5985.htmlManagers of the ABRY Fund V were so successful they had investors waiting to pour in an additional $3 billion. But to invest that much would require trade-offs that could jeopardize the chemistry that made the fund successful in the first place. Take the money or walk away?


2007.8
An adage that, referring to the risk/return trade-off, says that the type of security an investor chooses depends on whether he or she wants to eat well or sleep well.

Investopedia Says:Investing in high-risk, high-reward securities will offer you the potential to eat well, but the risky nature of these securities might prevent you from sleeping at night. By contrast, investing safely means that you will sleep well, but the low rate of return may keep you from eating well.


trade-off
noun
1 [C] a situation in which you balance two opposing situations or qualities:
There is a trade-off between doing the job accurately and doing it quickly.
She said that she'd had to make a trade-off between her job and her family.

2 [C usually singular] a situation in which you accept something bad in order to have something good:
For some car buyers, lack of space is an acceptable trade-off for a sporty design.

chemistry Show phonetics
noun [U]
1 (the part of science which studies) the basic characteristics of substances and the different ways in which they react or combine with other substances:
She studied chemistry and physics at college.
A team of scientists has been studying the chemistry of the ozone layer.
a chemistry department/laboratory

2 INFORMAL understanding and attraction between two people:
There was an immediate sexual chemistry between us the first time we met.

chem・is・try


━━ n. 化学; 化学作用; 化学的性質; (体の)化学的組成; (人の)体質; 人間関係.

walk away (DIFFICULT SITUATION) phrasal verb DISAPPROVING
to stop being involved in a situation because it is difficult to deal with or does not give you any advantages:
You can't just walk away from a marriage at the first sign of a problem.


out of order

mainly uk informal

If something someone says or does is out of order, it is unpleasant or not suitable and it is likely to upset or offend people:

His behaviour in the meeting was out of order.



subculture 
noun [C]
the way of life, customs and ideas of a particular group of people within a society, which are different from the rest of that society:
youth subcultures
the gay subculture





expatriate
noun [C] (INFORMAL expat)
someone who does not live in their own country:
A large community of expatriates has settled there.


trade-off トレードオフ ((同時に満足できない諸条件の間の取捨選択[調整])).

trade-off
noun
1 [C] a situation in which you balance two opposing situations or qualities:
There is a trade-off between doing the job accurately and doing it quickly.
She said that she'd had to make a trade-off between her job and her family.

2 [C usually singular] a situation in which you accept something bad in order to have something good:
For some car buyers, lack of space is an acceptable trade-off for a sporty design.


pro-, jettison, lanyard, prostration, safeguard free expression

Net Neutrality Is Trump's Next Target, Administration Says

By STEVE LOHR

The White House said its next move to deregulate broadband service would be to jettison the Obama administration's net neutrality rules, which were intended to safeguard free expression online.


He lay on his front in silence for some minutes
The 79-year-old pontiff was helped to the ground of the ornate church…
DAILYM.AI



Li's statement comes amid steadily improving ties between Taiwan and the mainland. Since coming into office 13 months ago, President Ma Ying-jeou has jettisoned his predecessor's pro-independence policies, in favor of much greater political and economic engagement with China.



With appliance sales getting hit by the slowing U.S. economy and the housing bust, jettisoning the business could help GE reach its long-term goal of boosting profits by at least 10% annually.

在美國經濟放緩以及住房市場危機的雙重打壓下﹐家電銷售行情受到負面影響﹐此時選擇剝離?家電業務將有助於通用電氣實現其利潤每年至少增長10%的長期目標。


Office Networking, by the Numbers
To get a sense of what this approach looks like, consider the Hitachi Business Microscope—a gadget about the size of a company ID badge that workers wear on a lanyard around their neck.


Different degrees of bowing and prostration, here drawn fromEastern Orthodox religious liturgical use

prostration :伏地禮;俯身致敬。

lanyard

Syllabification: (lan·yard)
Pronunciation: /ˈlanyərd/
Translate lanyard | into Italian


noun

  • a rope threaded through a pair of deadeyes, used to adjust the tension in the rigging of a sailing vessel.
  • a cord passed around the neck, shoulder, or wrist for holding a knife, whistle, or similar object.

Origin:

late Middle English lanyer, in the general sense 'a short length of rope or line for securing something', from Old French laniere. The change in the ending in the 17th century was due to association with yard1


[名]
1 《海事》
(1) ラニヤード, 締め綱.
(2) (笛やナイフをつるす)細ひも.
2 《軍事》(大砲発射用の)引き綱.
3 《米国軍》(勲章を示す)色ひも;銃ひも.

pro-1

Syllabification: (pro-)
Translate pro- | into Spanish



prefix

  • favoring; supporting:pro-choice pro-life
  • denoting motion forward, out, or away:proceed propel prostrate

Origin:

from Latin pro 'in front of, on behalf of, instead of, on account of'

pro-2

Syllabification: (pro-)
Translate pro- | into Spanish



prefix

  • before in time, place, order, etc.:proactive prognosis program

Origin:

from Greek pro 'before'



jettison 
verb [T]
1 to get rid of something or someone that is not wanted or needed:
The station has jettisoned educational broadcasts.

2 to decide not to use an idea or plan:
We've had to jettison our holiday plans because of David's accident.

3 to throw goods, fuel or equipment from a ship or aircraft to make it lighter:
The captain was forced to jettison the cargo and make an emergency landing.

peer review, rendering, in-depth findings, out of one's depth, sound out, in a hole


Far from taking Washington by storm, America’s CEO is out of his depth. Our editorial this week


The Trump presidency is in a hole
And that is bad for America—and the world
ECONOMIST.COM






Adrian Mann
Life Out There


Emerige
Paris Project Shows Ambitions in Suburbs
By PETER SIGAL


The 154-acre Clichy Batignolles, named for the adjoining neighborhoods in northwest Paris, will include offices, housing, a park and a court complex. Above, a rendering.

Boldly Dreaming of a Voyage to the Stars
By DENNIS OVERBYE


Darpa, the government agency that helped invent the Internet, is studying what it would take to send humans to another star. Above, a rendering of a spacecraft.


法新社倫敦1日電,位於倫敦的英國皇家學會(Royal Society)建立至今已有350年歷史,奠定了現代科學基石,例如倡導以實驗證明事實、建立「同儕評鑑」(peer review)原則,乃至強調客觀的學會座右銘「勿信傳言」,都是至今現代科學遵循的研究準則。 ..



Energy | 29.11.2011
Smartphones could have better energy efficiency, Finnish researchers say







The researchers hope mobile phone users in the developing world will benefit most

Aalto University researchers claim they've quadrupled the energy efficiency of smartphones. This could improve mobile Internet access in developing countries.


A Finnish research team says it's slashed smart phone energy use by more than 70 percent - a finding that may help people in developing countries get better Internet access.

Smartphones - mobile phones that can run applications and use the Web easily - are on the rise worldwide. Recent industry analysis from Gartner shows that 115 million smartphones were sold worldwide in the third quarter of 2011 alone.

The key behind these new energy savings is a network proxy, which better organizes the flow of data between a mobile phone and the network, explained Jukka Manner, the lead scientist for the study at Aalto University, outside of Helsinki.

The team hopes to use a combination of new software on the phone and network proxy hardware to use the phone's cellular radio in a much more energy-efficient manner.

The team presented initial findings at the Africomm Conference in Tanzania last week. Manner told Deutsche Welle that the research has been peer-reviewed, and that in-depth findings would be published early next year.

Internet for developing countries

The researchers looked at use cases in Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya, hoping to develop solutions for times when access to electricity was difficult.

Aalto University researchers want to add another layer to existing mobile infrastructure"In Finland, it's annoying when you're to not be able to charge your phone. But in many places around the world, it's not just annoying, but impossible," Manner said.

Only about 11 percent of Africa's population has Internet access. Yet more than half of the people on the continent have mobile phones.

And according to the Finnish team's research, 90 percent Africans live in areas with mobile phone coverage.

Manner emphasized that though the team looked at cases in Africa, "the technology is not tied to any network or country," and can theoretically be implemented anywhere.

Proxy solution

A proxy is a device that gathers data requests from the phone, then sends them on to the network. Communication goes the other way as well, with the proxy receiving "answers" from the Internet to pass along to the mobile phone.

115 million smartphones were sold worldwide in the third quarter of 2011The we content proxy involves a "client application that talks to a dedicated server," Manner said, which organizes the flow of data.

Manner said the Web browser Opera works in a similar fashion.

The device can increase efficiency by, for example, sending bursts of data packets at one time rather than continuously. This results in more "sleep" time for the cell phone, saving battery use.

"It seems a fairly complex and sophisticated piece of technology they've developed," said Steve Furber, a professor at the School of Computer Science at the University of Manchester, in an interview with Deutsche Welle. Furber is also one of the designers behind the energy efficient ARM microprocessor, which is in use in many smartphones, including the iPhone.

Combined efficiency

The Aalto University researchers say they managed to cut power use from smart phones by up to 74 percent.

Although the proxy accounted for the bulk of saved energy, the researchers also utilized websites optimized for mobile phones, Web compression and better data caching to increase efficiency.

Manner noted that they didn't lower the data quality or use any sort of compression.

"We can probably go over 80 percent savings," Manner said.

Author: Sonya Angelica Diehn

Editor: Cyrus Farivar



TOKYO (Reuters) - Orix Corp , Japan's largest leasing company, and consumer credit firm Credit Saison are in merger talks, financial sources close to the matter said on Tuesday, seeking a deal to form a $106 billion finance group.

Orix has sounded out Mizuho Financial Group , Credit Saison's top shareholder, about selling its stake to allow the merger to happen, the sources told Reuters.




sound out


Seek the views or intentions of, as in We'd better sound out Mom about who's using the station wagon, or Let's sound out the staff before we decide which week we should close for vacation.

This expression derives from sound meaning "to measure the depth of water by lowering a line or lead." It was transferred to other kinds of inquiry in the late 1500s, but out was not added for several centuries.





peer review system

n

A professionally sponsored and operated system for the rendering of professional judgment on disagreements between or among dentists, patients, or fiscal intermediaries, respecting quality of care and related matters.




rendering
[réndəriŋ]

(rĕn'dər-ĭng) 

n.
A depiction or interpretation, as in painting or music.
A drawing in perspective of a proposed structure.
A translation: a rendering of Cicero's treatises into English.
A coat of plaster or cement applied to a masonry surface.


[名][U][C]


1 役作り, 演出, 演奏, (考えなどの)描写, 描出.


2 翻訳, 訳文


a Japanese rendering of the New Testament

新約聖書の日本語訳.


3 透視図;《建築》下塗り.

4 《コンピュータ》レンダリング:コンピュータの画像の三次元化.





out of one's depth


In water too deep to stand in:just out of our depth, we bounce down below the surface of the water

In a situation that is beyond one’s capabilities:they soon realized they were out of their depth in Division OneI find it difficult to talk in a situation like this—I’m out of my depth

gunk, bottle, cask, Q-tips, bottled water, You can't put new wine into old bottle.guzzle, next to, gas-guzzler


The global market for bottled water has grown by 9% annually in recent years


No Q-tips in sight
30 ear-cleaning masters from China signed a petition in hope of turning…
DAILYM.AI


Q-tips®

www.qtips.com/

High quality Q-tips cotton swabs are made from 100% pure cotton and perfect for a variety of uses! Get great tips and learn about our products here.

"The worst thing you can do to an industry struggling right now is to let them lapse back into making gas-guzzlers," said Ann Mesnikoff, director of the Sierra Club's green transportation campaign. "Oil prices are down now, but in three to five years, they'll be up, and the automakers will be making vehicles the public won't buy."

On the Cover of the Sunday Book Review


By ELIZABETH ROYTE
Reviewed by LISA MARGONELLI
Elizabeth Royte asks why Americans spend billions on bottled water when they can guzzle tap water for next to nothing.

Rethinking the Meat-Guzzler

guzzle
verb [I or T] INFORMAL ━━ v. がぶがぶ飲む, がつがつ食べる ((away, down, up)).
to eat or drink quickly, eagerly and usually in large amounts:
I'm not surprised you feel sick after guzzling three ice-creams!
You're bound to get indigestion if you guzzle like that!

guzzler
noun [C] INFORMAL
She's a real guzzler!gas guzzler noun [C] MAINLY US INFORMAL
a car that uses a lot of fuel

gas-guzzling
adjective [before noun]
next to
1 used when describing two people or things that are very close to each other with nothing between them:
Can I sit next to the window?
There was a really strange man standing next to me at the station.

2 used to mean `after' when making a choice or a comparison:
I'd say cheese is my favourite food and, next to that, chocolate (= Cheese is the only food that I like more than chocolate).

3 almost:
They pay me next to nothing (= very little) but I really enjoy the work.
It's next to impossible (= extremely difficult) to find somewhere cheap to live in the city centre.
We got home in next to no time (= very little time).




gunk
(gŭngk) pronunciation
n. Informal
A thick greasy substance.

[After Gunk, a trademark for a degreasing solvent.]
(gungk)

noun
Any sticky or greasy residue or accumulation.

Etymology
Originally a trademark name for a degreasing solvent.
Usage
"`I carry a bottle wherever I go,' the 25-year-old said Tuesday while on the job at Gold's Gym in Westport. `It's so portable, and you never know what gunk is in those water pipes.'" — David Klepper, Dental group says bottled water can lack fluoride, Kansas City Star, Jun 21, 2000.



You can't put new wine into old bottle.

With allusion to matthew ix. 17 (AV) Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish. The idea is also expressed allusively as a metaphorical phrase.
The new spirits had animated the prose of Chateaubriand and the poetry of Lamartine; but‥the form of both these writers retained most of the important characteristics of the old tradition. It was new wine in old bottles.
[1912 L. Strachey Landmarks in French Literature vi.]
The new wines of industrialism and democracy have been poured into old bottles and they have burst the old bottles beyond repair.
[1948 A. J. Toynbee Civilization on Trial vi.]
‘I don't think you can put new wine in old bottles.’ I looked doubtful. ‥‘A lot of this could be rationalized.’
[1960 I. Jefferies Dignity & Purity viii.]
‘Motives?‥Good old-fashioned lust.’ ‘That hardly explains the explosive nature of his end.’‥‘You can't put new wine in old bottles.’
[1974 T. Sharpe Porterhouse Blue x.]
Related to: innovation


bottle,

(bŏt'l) pronunciation
n.
  1. A receptacle having a narrow neck, usually no handles, and a mouth that can be plugged, corked, or capped.
  2. The quantity that a bottle holds.
  3. A receptacle filled with milk or formula that is fed, as to babies, in place of breast milk.
  4. Informal.
    1. Intoxicating liquor: Don't take to the bottle.
    2. The practice of drinking large quantities of intoxicating liquor: Her problem is the bottle.
tr.v., -tled, -tling, -tles.
  1. To place in a bottle.
  2. To hold in; restrain: bottled up my emotions.
[Middle English botel, from Old French botele, from Medieval Latin butticula, diminutive of Late Latin buttis, cask.]
bottler bot'tler n.