2016年3月31日 星期四

entrancing, pony up, allussion, dry up, be (in) out of pocket


“Her laughter was entrancing, it was outrageous laughter, almost like a child’s laughter."



‘Towne is a romantic poet with a watercolour brush. His tranquil and ravishing, yet morbid and pessimistic dream of Rome is a meditation on the death of empires and the vastness of time… entrancing’.
★★★★★ The Guardian ow.ly/XlWIF


 《中英對照讀英文》Italian museum burns artworks in protest at cuts 義大利美術館燒藝術品抗議削減開支

國泰世華白金卡友,搭東方航空對飛兩 岸,即可享經濟艙升級好康!
◎陳維真
A museum in Italy has started burning its artworks in protest at budget cuts which it says have left cultural institutions out of pocket.
義大利一家美術館開始燒毀館藏藝術品,抗議政府削減預算,讓文化機構賠錢經營。
Antonio Manfredi, of the Casoria Contemporary Art Museum, set fire to the first painting on Tuesday."Our 1,000 artworks are headed for destruction anyway because of the government’s indifference," he said.
卡索利亞當代美術館的安東尼歐曼佛萊帝,週二點火焚燒第一幅畫作。「我們的1000件館藏,無論如何都要燒毀,都是政府漠視造成的。」
The work was by French artist Severine Bourguignon, who was in favour of the protest and watched it online.
這幅畫作是法國藝術家布赫吉農的作品,他支持抗議行動,並在線上觀看抗議過程。
Mr Manfredi plans to burn three paintings a week from now on, in a protest he has dubbed "Art War".
曼佛萊帝計畫從現在開始,在他稱為「藝術之戰」的抗議活動中,一週燒3幅畫。
Artists from across Europe have lent their support, including Welsh sculptor John Brown, who torched one of his works, Manifesto, on Monday.
歐洲各地的藝術家都表達支持,包括威爾斯雕刻家約翰布朗,在週一燒掉他的作品「宣言」。
Italy’s debt crisis led to the resignation of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi last year. Since his departure, the government has passed a tough package of austerity measures and other reforms.
義大利債務危機導致前總理貝魯斯孔尼去年辭職,自從他下台後,政府通過嚴苛的撙節措施方案,以及其他改革辦法。
Art institutions says they have been particularly affected by the country’s economic woes, with state subsidies and charitable donations drying up.
藝術機構表示他們受到經濟困境的影響特別大,國家補助削減,慈善捐款枯竭。


新聞辭典
out of pocket:片語,賠錢。例句:The organizer of the concert was £3,700 out of pocket after it was cancelled.(該演唱會的主辦方在演唱會取消後賠了3700英鎊。)


be in [out of] pocket
((英略式))金がある[ない], (一定金額を)得する[損する]
I'm £20 out of pocket.
20ポンドの損だ.

in favor of:片語,贊成…;支持…;有利於…。例句:They are in favor of reduced taxation.(他們支持減稅。)
dub:動詞,授予…稱號;把…叫做;給…取綽號。例句:They dubbed him a teflon.(他們稱他為不沾鍋。)


Credit Agricole Fund Eyes Japanese Properties
New York Times (blog)
The fund could pony up roughly $2.1 billion including loans, Hirotaka Uchiyama, the head of Fudo-Japan, CLSA Capital Partners KK, told the news agency. ...




A message from Berlin to U.S. officials arguing that Europeans should pony up as much economic stimulus as Washington: Germany's already doing it.


In reflecting on where a long career’s worth of architectural drawings and models will ultimately go, Frank Gehry is not focusing strictly on institutions that he feels close to — like the Guggenheim Museum, say, for which he designed a famous satellite branch in Bilbao, Spain. He’s trying to determine which place will pony up.
“I don’t want to give it away — it’s an asset,” Mr. Gehry said. “It’s the one thing in your life you build up, and you own it. And I’ve been spending a lot of rent to preserve it.”
Mr. Gehry, 78, is among a small but influential number of celebrity architects who are considering selling their archives — which can include tens of thousands of objects, from multiple large-scale models and reams of drawings to correspondence and other records — even as they continue to practice.
-- For Architects, the Archives as Gold Mine
By ROBIN POGREBIN
Published: July 23, 2007


pony up
Pay money that is owed or due, as in Come on, it's time you ponied up this month's rent. The allusion in this expression is unclear. [c. 1820]
WordNet的定義比較不適用下例 (雖然該付 談不上不情願)
The verb pony up has one meaning:
Meaning #1: give reluctantly
Synonyms: cough up, spit up






allussion 間接或隱約提及
You made an allusion to the events in Los Angels: could you ellaborate?
These are not jokes of the funny, ha-ha kind, but inside jokes historical or literary allusions that can be about James Bond or Provenal poetry scattered by an author who clearly likes to keep his audience guessing.
Take for instance, the love letters written by Baudolino, the new novel's title character, to the entrancingly beautiful wife of his patron, the Emperor Frederick. Many critics seized on these as obvious allusions to, or imitations of, what are known as the most famous love letters of the Middle Ages, those exchanged between Abelard and Helose. (Abelard, after all, does figure in the novel.)


entrance2
ɪnˈtrɑːns,ɛn-/
verb
gerund or present participle: entrancing
  1. fill (someone) with wonder and delight, holding their entire attention.
    "I was entranced by the city's beauty"
    synonyms:enchantbewitchbeguileenrapturecaptivatecapturemesmerize,hypnotizespellbind, hold spellbound, send into transports/raptures; More
    • cast a spell on.
      "Orpheus entranced the wild beasts"
      synonyms:cast a spell on, put a spell on, put under a spell, put in a trance,bewitchwitchhexspellbindhypnotizemesmerize;
      literarytrance
      "Orpheus entranced the wild beasts"



***

Pony up


Meaning


Pay money, especially a payment that is in arrears.

Origin

'Pony up' is very much an American phrase and most people in the USA will know its meaning, whereas elsewhere in the English-speaking world the expression is rarely used. In the UK we are more likely to 'stump up' and in Australia and New Zealand money is 'fronted up'. So what have ponies got to do with paying money?
A pony is of course a small horse and that meaning has been in use since the mid-1600s. The word has several other slang meanings, including:
- A small measure of alcohol (British, first documented in 1708)
- A short crib sheet or study aid (American, 1827)
- Twenty-five pounds (British slang, 1797)
- An abridged news report (American, 1877)
In the 1950s, 'pony' was also adopted as Cockney Rhyming Slang for 'rubbish; nonsense'. The full version of the rhyme is 'pony and trap' - and I'll leave it to you to figure out what 'trap' rhymes with.
The first use of 'pony up' in print that I can find is in the Connecticut publication The Rural Magazine, May 1819:
The afternoon, before the evening, the favoured gentlemen are walking rapidly into the merchant-tailors shops, and very slowly out, unless they ponied up the Spanish [the money].
It is most likely that the expression was coined in the USA, but a claim can also be made for a British origin. 'Pony up' was recorded in the UK in the 19th century, in Thomas Darlington's glossary Folk-speech of South Cheshire, 1887:
Pony, to pay. To 'pony out' = 'stump out'; a slang term.
Clearly, that is later than the American first usage, but how long it had been in vernacular use in England before Darlington recorded it is difficult to say. It is unlikely that the term migrated to Cheshire from the USA; migrations, of people and of language, were largely in the other direction at that date.
Whatever the location of the first use, it is clear from the 'pay money' meaning of 'pony up' that the pony in question is some form of currency or donation. The British 'twenty five pounds' meaning is a possibility, but seems rather too specific an amount; after all we can 'pony up' any amount. In fact, none of the numerous meanings of 'pony' appear to fit the bill and it may be that we are backing the wrong horse.
Enter stage right, a dark horse of another colour. The English quarter day of March 25th was the day that debts were settled and payments were made. The first two words of the fifth division of Psalm 119, which was always sung at Matins on the 25th day of the month, are 'Legem pone'. The term became associated with the payment of debts and was used as an allusive expression for 'payment of money; cash down'. That meaning of 'legem pone' was recorded as early as 1570 by Thomas Tusser in Hundreth Good Pointes Husbandry:
Use Legem pone to pay at thy day,
Was that the source of the term 'pony up' and should we really be spelling it 'pone up'? Well, we don't know for certain but, in a two-horse race, it seems a better place for your money than the eponymous pony.


bust (ARREST), partake, pathbreaking, capital calls, breaking news/Breakingviews, CCTV for marching orders





From the Fringe 15.10.2007

Bus Driver Sacked After Toilet Paper "Theft"

The health and safety of both the driver of a bus and the passengers must be the priority of all transport companies. However, one firm may have put both at risk in an unprecedented crackdown of diarrhea sufferers.

Germany continues to debate whether increased numbers of security cameras will help reduce the risk of terror attacks.

The German Interior Ministry is particularly keen on rolling out more surveillance systems and while there is a certain amount of concern among civil liberty groups and a percentage of the population, many Germans equate more security with more protection and seem to have few problems with the idea.

One section of the population who may start to have a problem with more CCTV is the nation's bus drivers. While a strategically placed camera may be used to identify a person of specific threat from ending hundreds of people's lives, a single device can also be used to ruin just one person's life and put his career on the skids.

Stomach cramps lead to employment pain
This is exactly what happened to German bus driver Jochen Lorenz. The 58-year-old driver from the central town of Ilmenau -- with no known affiliations with any terrorist group -- was sacked after being spotted taking a roll of toilet paper from the bus depot lavatory.

An Israeli plumber checks a toilet in a Tel Aviv bomb shelterBildunterschrift: Großansicht des Bildes mit der Bildunterschrift: Some thought the security measures went too far
Lorenz had arrived at work for his shift at 5:30 a.m., feeling a little under the weather with stomach cramps. He made an emergency visit to the loo shortly before taking his seat at the helm of his bus and, fearing he may be caught short on the route, took a roll from the cubicle just in case.

"I was feeling ill when I arrived at the bus depot. Stomach problems," Lorenz told the Bild Zeitung newspaper. "So I went to the lavatory. Things didn't get better so I took a roll of toilet paper and put it in the bus. I wanted to have some during the drive in case of an emergency."

Bus driver unaware of strict paper controls
The eye-in-the-sky, however, did not look favorably on this. The surveillance cameras had been installed by the powers that be to monitor strict control of toilet paper usage, among other things. This fact, unbeknownst to Lorenz at the time, was made glaringly and painfully obvious when he received his marching orders.

Rock fans with toilet paper  at the Wacken Open Air Rock FestivalBildunterschrift: Großansicht des Bildes mit der Bildunterschrift: Germans showed their solidarity for the sacked driver
The letter of dismissal stated that the quantity of toilet paper was strictly monitored and that a fresh roll of paper had disappeared.
“After the surveillance data was analyzed, it was found that you, Herr Lorenz, were the only user to use the facilities, at 05:49 hours," the letter from the bus company said.

Lorenz protested against the sacking and told his boss that the roll was still in the bus, but to no avail. So Lorenz took the company to court and managed to secure a pay-off settlement totaling €7,500 ($10,625).
DW staff (nda)




China’s Latest Crackdown: The Liquid Lunch
By JIM YARDLEY 5:14 PM ET
A Communist Party campaign aims to bust civil servants partaking in booze-soaked lunches.



German Cops Bust Italian With Cocaine Sandwich

One of the main ingredients of bread, as most people know, is flour, so
Frankfurt police weren't immediately suspicious when they stopped a driver
transporting a ciabatta. But this bread contained another sort of powder.

The DW-WORLD Article
http://newsletter.dw-world.de/re?l=evyouyI44va89pI2



to fund capital calls


By lending to its own employees to fund capital calls, Goldman Sachs is risking "TARP rage" -- the special wrath that taxpayers and lawmakers reserve for potentially questionable actions by those that receive money under the Troubled Asset Relief Program, Breakingviews says.



Breakingviews: Foxconn’s Deal to Buy Sharp Is a Test for Japanese Reform


魏國金
The exhibit at the Rijksmuseum, originally gifted to Willem Drees in 1969 by then US ambassador William Middendorf as a souvenir of a pathbreaking trip by three US astronauts on July 20, 1969.

這塊陳列於國立博物館的展品,原本是由當時的美國大使威廉.米登道夫於1969年,當作是同年7月20日3名美國太空人率先登月的紀念品,贈送給威廉.德瑞斯。 (此姓氏翻譯可能有問題 EE 讀 E")

breaking news

NOUN

[MASS NOUN]
Newly received information about an event that is currently occurring or developing:some breaking news now of a rescue situation in Californiathe announcement will likely be the lead story for the broadcastbarring other major breaking news


closed-circuit television (¦klōzd ¦sər·kət ′tel·ə′vizh·ən) (communications)
Any application of television that does not involve broadcasting for public viewing; the programs can be seen only on specified receivers connected to the television camera by circuits, which include microwave relays and coaxial cables. Abbreviated CCTV.


pathbreaking︰形容詞,開路先鋒的、開創性的。例如︰pathbreaking scientific discoveries(開創性的科學發現。)

adj.
Characterized by originality and innovation; pioneering.


capital calls
Requests for additional money required of investors to fund a deficit. A corporate stockholder has no legal obligation to meet a capital call.


cop was found in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary at the entries listed below.


bust (ARREST) Show phonetics
verb [T] bust or US bustedbust or US busted SLANG
When the police bust a person they arrest him or her, or when they bust a building or a place they arrest people in it who they believe are breaking the law:
The police busted him because they think he's involved with a terrorist group.

bust Show phonetics
noun [C] SLANG
an occasion when police arrest people who are thought to have broken the law:

In their latest drugs bust police entered a warehouse where cocaine dealers were meeting.





bust noun [C] SLANG
an occasion when police arrest people who are thought to have broken the law:
In their latest drugs bust police entered a warehouse where cocaine dealers were meeting.


━━ v., n. 〔話〕 =burst; 〔話〕 破産[失敗](する[させる]); 【軍】降格する; こわす; 破裂させる; なぐる; 馴らす; 〔米俗〕 逮捕[手入れ](する) ((for)); 〔話〕 どんちゃん騒ぎ; 不景気, 不況; 〔話〕 殴打.
bust out 〔米〕 一斉に開花する; 〔俗〕 脱走する ((of)).
bust up 〔俗〕 けんかする; 〔米〕 破損する; 〔米〕 別れる.━━ a. 〔話〕 壊れた; 破産した.
bust・er ━━ n. 〔話〕 こわす人[もの], 暴風; 〔俗〕 すごい人[子]; 〔俗〕 (時にB-) ((呼びかけ)) 小僧, にいさん, 君; =baby buster.
bust-up 〔英〕 けんか; 離婚, 解散.


partake (EAT/DRINK) Show phonetics
verb [I] partook, partaken OLD-FASHIONED OR HUMOROUS
to eat or drink:
Would you care to partake of a little wine with us?

booze Show phonetics 即上文的 liquid
noun [U] INFORMALalcohol:
The party's at Kate's on Friday night - bring some booze.




on skid row MAINLY US INFORMAL
poor, without a job or a place to live, and often drinking too much alcoholmarching orders plural noun (US USUALLY walking papers) INFORMAL
If you give someone their marching orders, you ask them to leave a place or a job because they have done something wrong:
Three players got their marching orders last week.
She was called into the boss's office and given her marching orders

chomping their way through, cigar-chomping

Scientists first raised the alarm 50 years ago about crown-of-thorns starfish chomping their way through the Great Barrier Reef. In 2015 we reported that divers were injecting starfish with a solution made of salts from cattle-bile. It killed more than 300,000 starfish in its first year of use. Unfortunately, that is only a fraction of the tens of millions thought to infest the entire reef

PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY
Amazon's Kindle 2 Improves the Good, Leaves Out the Bad
Amazon's electronic book reader Kindle 2 fixes the worst design flaws while maintaining the excellent book-buying experience of its predecessor.


DealBook took a look at Mr. Schwartz, a polished investment banker who helped build the firm's corporate finance unit in the 1980s -- and represents a stylistic change from his cigar-chomping predecessor.

chomp
verb [I or T] (ALSO champ) INFORMAL
to chew food noisily:
He was chomping away on a bar of chocolate.
There she sat, happily chomping her breakfast.

pre・de・ces・sor



-->
━━ n. 前任者; 先輩; 先祖; 前の物.


weal and woes, frosty, frosted, silvery, hoary, vow, transparency



【Death & Life Tour】Take a trip back in time to see how the Chinese population of Sheung Wan used to live while we visit some local institutions and discuss death rituals in Chinese culture.
【生與死行街團】上環現在是個商店、咖啡室林立的小區,你知道從前是個不大受歡迎的地區嗎?除了因為這裏是早期華人聚居之地,生活環境不大理想之外,醫院、殯儀服務等「死人嘢」都集中於此。四月九日(六),參加我們的上環之旅,探索神秘卻有趣的生死習俗。
更多



Lucas Jackson/Reuters
Revealing New Layers of African Fashion
The hastily formed African Fashion Collective staged a show that aimed to dispel some of the hoary clichés that cling to the continent.
photoSilvery fountains lure autumn hikers (TORU NAKATA/ THE ASAHI SHIMBUN)
Tourists stroll through a sea of silver Japanese pampas grass as autumn descends on the Sengokuhara highlands in Hakone, a popular tourist spot in western Kanagawa Prefecture that includes Lake Ashinoko. The local tourist association says the tall, feathery heads of eulalia grass, which sway in the autumn breezes, are expected to last through the end of October across vast expanses of the highlands, which stand around 700 meters above sea level. (IHT/Asahi: October 4,2008)


Merkel and Sarkozy Meet Under Gathering Storm Clouds

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy were to meet later Thursday in Paris with relations between Paris and Berlin on the frosty side after a series of differences of opinion.

To read this article on the DW-WORLD website, just click on the
internet address below:
http://newsletter.dw-world.de/re?l=evx2byI44va89pI0&req=l%3Devx2bwI44va89pI0



Rosa was dressed for walking. She expected him. It was a bright, frosty day, and Miss Twinkleton had already graciously sanctioned fresh air.




Making money off the popular video-sharing service is a top Google priority this year, Chief Executive Eric Schmidt has said.
• "Transparency" is a hot computing buzzword as everyone from Twitter to SalesForce.com seeks to share information about Web service availability so customers and users don't feel quite so helpless when things go wrong. And Google has showed it got transparency religion while trying to reassure Google Apps customers hurt by an August Gmail outage.





China Fund Vows Transparency
The president of China's sovereign-wealth fund pledged to increase transparency and said the fund will play no role in the management of the companies it invests in.



SHANGHAI — Fresh ethnic violence has erupted in a Tibetan region of southwestern China, with disputed reports of eight people shot dead by the police, and the Chinese government on Friday vowed swift and severe punishment of Tibetans accused of rioting and taking part in last month’s antigovernment protests.

weal 2 

Pronunciation: /wiːl/ 

NOUN

[MASS NOUN] formal
That which is best for someone or something:I am holding this trial behind closed doors in the public weal

Phrases

the common weal

The benefit or interests of all members of a country or community:such things as police protection and national defence are benefits vital to the common weal

Origin

Old English wela 'wealth, well-being', of West Germanic origin; related to well1.


vow Show phonetics
verb [T]
to make a determined decision or promise to do something:
[+ (that)] The guerillas vowed (that) they would overthrow the government.
[+ to infinitive] After the awful meals we had last Christmas, I vowed to do more of the cooking myself.

vow Show phonetics
noun [C]
a serious promise or decision:
[+ to infinitive] She took/made a vow never to lend money to anyone again.



transparent Show phonetics
adjective
1 If a substance or object is transparent, you can see through it very clearly:
Grow the bulbs in a transparent plastic box, so the children can see the roots growing.
Her blouse was practically transparent!
Compare opaquetranslucent.

2 clear and easy to understand or recognize:
I think we should try to make the instructions more transparent.

transparency Show phonetics
noun
1 [U] the characteristic of being easy to see through:
The old-fashioned type of plastic lacked transparency.

2 [C] SPECIALIZED a photograph or picture printed on plastic which you can see on a screen by shining a light through it

(1) The quality of being able to see through a material. The terms transparency and translucency are often used synonymously; however, transparent would technically mean "seeing through clear glass," while translucent would mean "seeing through frosted glass." See alpha blending. See also transparent.
(2) A film-based photographic negative or positive. Light is beamed through the film for display, scanning or processing.


Bringing transparency to Buddhist funerals

Peanut Butter on the Chin by James O’Toole

運用 PDCA, Bill 說戴明博士故事,「擦り合わせ」透明化(transparency)

trans・par・ent



   
━━ a. 透明な; すけて見える; (文体などが)平明な; 率直な; 見えすいた; 【コンピュータ】(ソフトウェアなどが)透過性の.
 trans・parence ━━ n. 透明(度).
 trans・par・en・cy ━━ n. 透明(度); 透かし絵[文字]; スライド; 【コンピュータ】透過性.
 trans・par・ent・ly ━━ ad.

sil・ver

━━ n. 銀; 銀貨; ((集合的)) 銀の食器; 銀色; 銀メダル.
━━ a. 銀(色)の, 銀製の; (音が)澄んだ; 弁舌さわやかな.
━━ v. 銀をかぶせる, 銀めっきする; 銀色にする[なる]; 白髪になる.
silver age 【ギリシア・ローマ神話】(the ~) 銀の時代.
silver birch 【植】シラカバ.
silver bromide 【化】臭化銀.
silver chloride 【化】塩化銀.
silver dollar (米国のかつての)1ドル銀貨.
silver・fish (各種の)銀色の魚; 【虫】シミ.
silver foil 銀箔(ぱく).
silver fox ギンギツネ(の毛皮).
silver iodide 【化】ヨウ化銀.
silver jubilee 25年祭.
silver lining 黒い雲からのぞく銀色のふち; 不幸の中に見える明るい希望.
Every cloud has a silver lining. どんなことにもどこか光明がある.
silver medal 銀メダル.
silver-mirror test 【化】銀鏡反応.
sil・vern ━━ a. 〔古〕 銀の(ような).
silver nitrate 【化】硝酸銀.
silver oxide 【化】酸化銀.
silver paper 銀紙; 錫(すず)[アルミ]箔.
silver plate ((集合的)) 銀(めっき)の食器; 銀めっき.
silver-plated a. 銀めっきの.
silver screen 銀幕; (the ~) ((集合的)) 映画.
silver・side 〔英〕 牛の最上もも肉; (pl.) トウゴロウイワシ.
silver・smith 銀細工師.
silver spoon 銀のスプーン.
born with a silver spoon in one's mouth 富貴の家に生れる.
silver standard (the ~) 銀本位制.
Silver Star 【米陸軍】銀星勲章.
Silver・stone シルバーストーン (((1)金属表面こげつき防止加工; 商標.(2)英国 Northamptonshire にある自動車レース場)).
silver-tongued ━━ a. 雄弁な.
silver・ware ((集合的)) (食卓用)銀器.
silver wedding (anniversary) 銀婚式 ((結婚25年の祝い)).
silver・weed 【植】ヨウシュノツルキンバイ.
sil・ver・y ━━ a. 銀(鈴)のような, (音の)澄んだ; 銀色の.
sil・ver・i・ness 

n.
silver Show phonetics
noun [C or U]
a valuable shiny white metal that is used for making utensils, jewellery, coins and decorative objects:
We gave Alison and Tom a dish made of solid silver as a wedding present.
Cleaning the silver (= silver objects) is a dirty job.
Shall we use the silver (= utensils made of silver) for dinner tonight?
I need some silver (= coins made of silver or a metal of similar appearance) for the ticket machine in the car park.
See also silver (medal).

silver Show phonetics
adjective
made of silver, or of the colour of silver:
a silver ring
My grandmother has silver hair.

silver Show phonetics
verb [T often passive]
to cover something, especially a window, with a thin layer of silver-coloured material in order to make a mirror

silvery Show phonetics
adjective LITERARY
The grass was silvery with frost.
We were woken early by the peal of silvery bells (= those having a pleasant clear musical sound).

frosty


adj.
, -i·er, -i·est.
  1. Producing or characterized by frost; freezing. See synonyms at cold.
  2. Covered with or as if with frost.
  3. Silvery white; hoary.


hoary
adjective
1 OLD-FASHIONED very old and familiar and therefore not interesting or amusing:
He told a few hoary old jokes and nobody laughed.

2 LITERARY (of a person) very old and white- or grey-haired
  1. Cold in manner: a frosty look; a frosty farewell.